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300+ Italian Girl Names

  1. GiaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian
    • Meaning:

      "God's gracious gift"
    • Description:

      Gia is a cute if slight name that calls to mind stylish sisters Mia, Lea, Pia, Tia, and Nia. One of the most familiar Italian baby names in the US, Gia is a short form of Gianna, which in turn is a diminutive of Giovanna, the feminine form of Giovanni, the Italian equivalent of John—all of them meaning "God's gracious gift."
  2. GiannaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian, diminutive of Giovanna
    • Meaning:

      "the Lord is gracious"
    • Description:

      Gianna originated as a diminutive for Giovanna—a Latin feminization of John. The root name among these is the Hebrew name Yochanen, meaning "the Lord is gracious." Common nickname include Gia and Gigi, and the English form of Gianna is Joanna.
  3. BellaHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Isabella, Italian
    • Meaning:

      "beautiful"
    • Description:

      Bella derived as a diminutive of Isabella and other names with the suffix -bella. While Isabella is a variation of Elizabeth and thus means "God is my oath," Bella is considered to mean "beautiful." This is because Bella is related to the word for "beautiful" in languages including Spanish, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, and Greek, as well as the name Belle, which means "beautiful" in French.
  4. IdaliaHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "behold the sun"
    • Description:

      A pretty, if unusual choice for a summer baby, particularly a girl with an ancestor named Ida. An epithet of the goddess Aphrodite, Idalia is derived from the Greek place name Idalion.
  5. AlessiaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Alexis
    • Meaning:

      "defending warrior"
    • Description:

      Young Canadian pop singer Alessia Cara has given this spicy-sounding name a new lease on life, propelling it into the Top 1000 in 2016. (It was one of the year's fastest-rising girls' names.) The main risk is that it feels so close to Alexa, Alicia, Alexis and Alyssa-- all becoming overused -- that it could be mistaken for one of those more familiar names.
  6. GabriellaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian feminine variation of Gabriel
    • Meaning:

      "God is my strength"
    • Description:

      Gabriella is the feminine form of Gabriel, a name derived from the Hebrew Gavri’el. Gavri’el is composed of the elements gever, meaning "strong," and ’el, referring to God. Gabriella is used among a variety of cultures in the US, including Italian Americans, Latinos, and in the Jewish community. Gabriela is the Spanish spelling.
  7. OrianaHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "dawn"
    • Description:

      Oriana is a dashing medieval name, with a meaning similar to Aurora. At this point, though, Oriana is much more unusual than Aurora and makes a unique choice if you're searching for names that mean new beginnings or dawn.
  8. RosaHeart
    • Origin:

      Latinate variation of Rose
    • Meaning:

      "rose, a flower"
    • Description:

      As sweet-smelling as Rose but with an international flavour, Rosa is one of the most classic Portuguese, Spanish and Italian names, which is also favored by upper-class Brits, having an ample measure of vintage charm. Rosa has been on the popularity charts for every year that's been counted, especially popular from the 1880s through the beginning of the twentieth century.
  9. EleanoraHeart
    • Origin:

      Latinate form of Eleanor, meaning unknown
    • Description:

      Eleanor is back, Nora is back, and soon Eleanora will be too. Off the charts since the 1930s, this elaboration of the classic Eleanor was in common use for decades before falling from favor. Spelling Eleonora adds yet another syllable to make the pronunciation el-LAY-oh-nor-a, and you can try to instruct people to say Eleanora that way too, but most will pronounce it like Eleanor with an a at the end and that's just fine. That final vowel gives a serious, stately name a little flip at the end, making it more elaborate and Latinate.
  10. MarcellaHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "warlike"
    • Description:

      Marcella has been in mothballs for so long it's starting to feel stylish again. Depicted as the world's most beautiful woman in Don Quixote (where it's spelled Marcela), this long neglected name seemed dated for decades but just might be ready for restoration.
  11. AngelicaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian, Polish, Russian diminutive of Angela
    • Meaning:

      "angel or angelic"
    • Description:

      Angelica is by far the choicest form of the angelic names -- more delicate than Angelina, more feminine than Angel, more modern than Angela. But though Angelica is so lacy and poetic, it lags behind the bolder Angelina (probably for obvious reasons).
  12. AdelinaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian, Spanish, Portuguese and Slavic variation of Adeline
    • Meaning:

      "noble, nobility"
    • Description:

      Adelina is back in the Top 1000 after an absence of nearly a century, thanks to the meteoric rise of her sister name Adeline -- along with Adelaide, Adele, and Ada. Some parents choose Adelina because they want to get to cute vintage nickname Addie, but others favor it as a slightly more unusual form of this sweet vintage girls' name. A lot of attention was focused on it recently via the women's figure skating gold medal winner at the Sochi winter olympics--Adelina Sotnikova.

      While Adeline is usually pronounced in the U.S. with a long i in the last syllable, to rhyme with mine, Adelina is pronounced with the long e sound at the end, as in 'lee-na'.

  13. ArianaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian variation of Ariadne, Greek
    • Meaning:

      "most holy"
    • Description:

      The smooth, attractive Ariana is on the rise along with the fame of pop princess Ariana Grande. Also famous is twin spelling Arianna, which is associated with Greek-born online presence Arianna Huffington. Both Ariana and Arianna are widely used names and are equally acceptable spellings.
  14. ZetaHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Zita or Greek letter name
    • Description:

      The sixth letter of the Greek alphabet, popularized by Welsh actress Catherine Zeta-Jones -- Zeta was her grandmother's first name. Zeta can also refer to the letter Z, the last in the Roman alphabet, or be a spelling variation of Zita, a name with several possible origins and meanings.
  15. TeresaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish
    • Meaning:

      "to harvest"
    • Description:

      How do you spell Teresa? Teresa, the simpler phonetic form of this name, was the most popular variation for its early life, when it was used exclusively in Spain and Portugal. Other spellings of Teresa include Theresa, the usual English form, and the French Therese.
  16. VivianaHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "life"
    • Description:

      Lively and rhythmic version of Vivian heard in Italy and Spain. A vivid choice.
  17. AndreaHeart
    • Origin:

      Feminine variation of Andrew, Greek
    • Meaning:

      "strong and manly"
    • Description:

      Andrea — a feminine form of Andrew (and a male name in several European cultures) — comes with a good selection of pronunciations — ANN-dree-a, AHN-dree-a, or ahn-DRAY-a — each with a slightly different image: girl next door/slightly affected/downright mysterious
  18. AllegraHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian
    • Meaning:

      "joyous"
    • Description:

      In music, the term allegro means "quickly, lively tempo," which makes this quintessential Bohemian ballet dancer's name all the more appealing. Allegra is one of the most distinctive yet accessible girl names starting with A.
  19. CarinaHeart
    • Origin:

      Italian
    • Meaning:

      "dear little one"
    • Description:

      Carina is a pretty feminissima name whose fall from popularity may be speeded by similarity to (hurricane name) Katrina.
  20. HonoraHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "woman of honor"
    • Description:

      Honora and Honoria are two ways of softening the severity of Honor, while retaining its righteous meaning. They were predominant until the Reformation, when the Puritans adopted the abstract virtue names, and were introduced to Britain by the Normans.