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Names that Peaked in 1951

  1. JamesHeart
    • Origin:

      English variation of Jacob, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "supplanter"
    • Description:

      James is an English derivation of the Hebrew name Jacob. James is biblical (the name of two apostles in the New Testament), royal (kings of both England and Scotland), presidential (with more U.S. Chief Executives named James (six) than any other name), and it is shared by countless great writers and entertainers.
  2. ThomasHeart
    • Origin:

      Aramaic
    • Meaning:

      "twin"
    • Description:

      Thomas is the Greek variation of the Aramaic name Ta’oma’. It came about because there were too many apostles named Judas; Jesus renamed one Thomas—meaning "twin"—to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot and the Judas also known as Thaddeus. At first, it was used only for priests.
  3. GwendolynHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Gwendolen, Welsh
    • Meaning:

      "white ring"
    • Description:

      One spelling variation that's more popular than the original, this somewhat old-fashioned name might be in honor of poet Gwendolyn Brooks, the first African-American to win a Pulitzer prize for poetry, or may be a way to get to the modern short form Gwen.
  4. StephenHeart
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "garland, crown"
    • Description:

      Stephen, also spelled Steven, is a strong and likable classic, with the he's-a-great-guy short form Steve. Though not as well-used or fashionable as it was in its heyday -- it was a Top 25 name from 1946 to 1957 -- it's still a widely used name. It remains an even more popular in Ireland.
  5. PatriciaHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "noble, patrician"
    • Description:

      Patricia still sounds patrician, though its scores of nicknames definitely don't. Wildly popular from the forties (alternately Number 3 and 4 throughout the decade) to the sixties, Patricia has been fading ever since. But a comeback in its full form is definitely conceivable—just look at Penelope.
  6. RexHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "king"
    • Description:

      Now that many dogs are named Max, it's safe to use this sleek, solid, regal name again for your child. And with the charm of its final x, its regal meaning, and its offbeat simplicity, Rex is definitely one to consider.
  7. AlanHeart
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "handsome, cheerful"
    • Description:

      In its three most popular spellings -- Alan along with Allen and Allan -- this midcentury favorite has tended to skew older. It was a Top 100 name from 1938 to 1971, peaking at Number 40 in 1951. Alan has had leading roles on recent TV, in shows like Two and a Half Men, 24 and Boston Legal.
  8. MargoHeart
    • Origin:

      French, diminutive of Margaret
    • Meaning:

      "pearl"
    • Description:

      Margo and Margot sound exactly the same, so why has the Margot spelling hopped back onto the Top 1000, outpacing Margo in numbers more than two to one? (Over 350 baby girls were named Margot in the most recent year, versus 150 named Margo.)
  9. LindaHeart
    • Origin:

      Spanish, Portuguese and Italian word name meaning "pretty"
    • Meaning:

      "pretty"
    • Description:

      Linda will live forever in baby name history for toppling Mary from its four hundred year reign as Number 1. Queen of Names in 1947, Linda has fallen even further in favor than Mary today.
  10. LevonHeart
    • Origin:

      Armenian, variation of Leon
    • Meaning:

      "lion"
    • Description:

      Levon, an unusual alternative to Levi. has two musical associations: it's the title of an Elton John song, inspired by late, great drummer for The Band, Levon Helm--whose birth name was Mark. Uma Thurman and Ethan Hawke chose Levon for their son.
  11. KathrynHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Katherine and Catherine, Greek
    • Meaning:

      "pure"
    • Description:

      Although the Kathryn spelling feels like a modern streamlining of this ancient royal and saints' name, it is in fact found back through history. At least one of Henry the Eighth's unfortunately wives sometimes spelled her name as Kathryn.
  12. GailHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew, short form of Abigail
    • Meaning:

      "my father rejoices"
    • Description:

      Gail was a mid-twentieth century favorite, which has been far surpassed by its original form, Abigail and nickname Abby. Spelling variations include Gale and Gayle, the latter represented by TV journalist and Oprah bestie Gayle King. Gail was most popular in the 1950s, when it was in the Top 40, and could rise again, possibly as a middle.
  13. JanHeart
    • Origin:

      Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, and Catalan variation of John
    • Meaning:

      "God is gracious"
    • Description:

      A standard form of John in Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Polish, Slovene, German, and Catalan. Properly pronounced yahn (in most of these languages), most Americans will still equate it with the Brady Bunchesque girls' name Jan.
  14. MarciaHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin, feminine version of Marcius
    • Meaning:

      "warlike"
    • Description:

      Marcia is an ancient Roman name which derives from Mars, the god of war. It was used by Dante in the Inferno and later by Thomas Hardy and others.
  15. RhonaHeart
    • Origin:

      Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "Scottish island name"
    • Description:

      Possibly started life as a short form of Rhonwen, but most likely derives from the name of the Hebridean island Rona, which means "rough island".
  16. JaniceHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Jane
    • Meaning:

      "God's gracious gift"
    • Description:

      For a minute or two this sounded more modern than Janet, now equally outmoded.
  17. KyleHeart
    • Origin:

      Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "narrow spit of land"
    • Description:

      Not as popular for girls as Kylie or Kyla, but we prefer its simplicity.
  18. LynneHeart
    • ErasmoHeart
      • GlindaHeart
        • Origin:

          Literary name
        • Description:

          Glinda is famous as the name of the Good Witch in The Wizard of Oz, invented by author L. Frank Baum. but has there ever been a real life, non-fictional Glinda? Not in the US last year. The name may be related to the Welsh Glenda, itself a 20th century invention.