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Hebrew Names

  1. AlvaHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "his highness"
    • Description:

      Edison's middle name is a fabulous option for parents looking for something with history and a soft sound. This could be the name you're looking for if you like Tesla's scientific pedigree but think that it has become too corporate with the advent of Elon Musk's company.
  2. JesseHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Jessie
    • Description:

      The boyish spelling, which is still pronounced with two syllables and a long e at the end, is sometimes used for girls, though the Jessie form -- whether short for Jessica or standing on its own, is usually considered the feminine one.
  3. RonjaHeart
    • Origin:

      Scandinavian form of Hebrew Ronia
    • Meaning:

      "God's joyful song"
    • Description:

      This name of a character from an Astrid Lindgren children's book, pronounced RON-ya,is a Top 100 name in Germany and Scandinavia and is related to the Hebrew name RONIA or RONIYA. RONYA is another form that in Russia may be used as a short form of VERONICA and ROXANA.
  4. ShebaHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew, short variation of Bathsheba
    • Meaning:

      "daughter of an oath"
    • Description:

      This biblical place-name for the region now known as Yemen started to feel fresh again as the name of the heroine of Zoe Heller's Notes on a Scandal, played on screen by Cate Blanchett.
  5. TallieHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Talia, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "gentle dew from heaven"
    • Description:

      Tallie is a seldom-heard nickname name that, with the ascendance of Hallie and Callie, we might just be hearing more of.
  6. ZephaniahHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "God has hidden"
    • Description:

      A minor prophet who has his own Book, Zephaniah is another Old Testament gem waiting to be rediscovered now that Noah and Abraham are becoming too trendy. The vowel-sound ending of Zephaniah is currently band on trend, along with other Biblical boys' names with softer sounds – think Elijah, Asher and Isaiah. Zephaniah would make a perfect lesser-used alternative to Zachariah.
  7. AbbigailHeart
    • Origin:

      Spelling variation of Abigail, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "my father is joyful"
    • Description:

      A fast-rising variation of Abigail that was shooting up the popularity charts a few years ago, but whose star is now falling now that Abigail is not quite as hot as she once was.
  8. AfraHeart
    • Origin:

      Arabic; Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "color of earth; dust"
    • Description:

      Earthier version of the name of England's first female professional writer, Aphra Behn.
  9. BitsyHeart
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Elizabeth, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "pledged to God"
    • Description:

      The archetypal diminutive, in every sense of the word. Bitsy enjoyed some use as a nickname in the era when children were named after family members and then called by a cute pet name: Chip, Skip, Babe, Bitsy. As a full name, it has made the US list only three times: in 1943, 1958 and 1962.
  10. EliamHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "God is my nation"
    • Description:

      A less common — and biblical — alternative to Liam. Eliam joined the Top 1000 for the first time in 2021.
  11. IsaiasHeart
    • Origin:

      Latin variation of Isaiah
    • Meaning:

      "Salvation of the Lord"
    • Description:

      Widely used in the Hispanic community, as is the shorter Isai. While the original Isaiah and cousin Isaac are much more popular, Isaias commanded attention as the name of a storm in the summer of 2020.
  12. DaniHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew and Italian, diminutive of Daniella, Danielle, Danita
    • Description:

      Short form occasionally used on its own, with an open and friendly androgynous quality.
  13. AtaliaHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Athalia, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "the Lord is exalted"
    • Description:

      Atalia or Athalia is a biblical name with a gory history. But it's an attractive name in step with the current fashion for A-starting and -ending names that are both distinctive and deeply rooted.
  14. DathanHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "fountain"
    • Description:

      Obscure Old Testament name that rhymes with (and might be a substitute for) Nathan.
  15. JessaHeart
    • Origin:

      Short form of Jessica
    • Description:

      Once rare, this streamlined form of Jessica has been boosted by two very different television figures: the Jemima Kirke character on HBO series Girls, and reality television daughter Jessa Duggar.
  16. JabinHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "perceptive"
    • Description:

      The name of two Old Testament kings that seems as ripe as you can get for modern use, given the popularity of sound-alike Biblical brethren Jadon and Jacob (and even mythological Jason). Note that different sources give wide-ranging meanings for Jabin, but we think "perceptive" is the most authoritative, not to mention appealing.
  17. YahirHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew and Arabic
    • Meaning:

      "he will enlighten"
    • Description:

      This Hebrew and Arabic name hit the US Top 300 in 2004 via an unusual inspiration: A Mexican pop singer and telenovela star known simply as Yahir. The star was named after a Brazilian soccer player.
  18. AdaminaHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "child of the red earth"
    • Description:

      This feminine form of Adam (Adama is another one) has none of the simple elegance of the original. Try Eve.
  19. KelilahHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "crown, laurel"
    • Description:

      Kelilah, also spelled Kelila, is a lovely and unusual name that would make a perfect substitute for the trendy Delilah.
  20. MalakiHeart
    • Origin:

      Variation of Malachi, Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "my messenger"
    • Description:

      Malachi is one of the surprise Biblical hits of recent years, in the US Top 200, and now spelling variation Malaki is in the Top 1000 too. Both names are pronounced with a long final i, as in "eye," but the Irish variation Malachy is MAL-ah-kee, which Malaki might mimic instead.