Names That Mean Archer

  1. Ivo
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "yew wood, archer"
    • Description:

      Ivo is an unusual, catchy name with the energetic impact of all names ending in 'o'. Hardly heard in the U.S., it is used a bit more frequently in England, as is the related Ivor, a favorite of such novelists as Evelyn Waugh and P.G. Wodehouse. Ivo is currently most popular in the Netherlands.
  2. Ivar
    • Origin:

      Norse
    • Meaning:

      "yew wood, archer"
    • Description:

      Part of a small group of similar names with similar roots — Ivor, Iver, Ivo, Ives — which are all worth looking at. Used throughout Scandinavia, Ivar is currently a Top 100 name in Sweden. In the Willa Cather novel O Pioneers!, there is a character known as —oops —Crazy Ivar.
  3. Kyler
    • Origin:

      Dutch
    • Meaning:

      "victory of the people"
    • Description:

      Kyler was once a creative solution for 90s parents who enjoyed the sounds of Kyle and Tyler but didn't want to use anything so popular. Now a well-established name on the US charts, it is given to more than 1000 babies every year.
  4. Ivara
    • Origin:

      German
    • Meaning:

      "yew tree, archer"
    • Description:

      Similar to Ivana but less personality-driven.
  5. Aivar
    • Origin:

      Estonian variation of Ivar, Norse
    • Meaning:

      "yew wood, archer"
    • Description:

      Form of Ivar most common in Estonia.
  6. Kyler
    • Origin:

      Dutch
    • Meaning:

      "archer"
    • Description:

      Used on a handful of girls every year since the 80s, Kyler provides an alternative for parents wanting something with the sounds or style of Skyler, Carter, Kaia, Kylie, and Kyla.
  7. Bowman
    • Origin:

      English surname
    • Meaning:

      "archer"
    • Description:

      Bowman has a lot of winning ingredients: an occupational surname, a cool "Bo" sound, and an archery-related meaning.
  8. Ifor
    • Origin:

      Welsh
    • Meaning:

      "archer"
    • Description:

      Ifor seems to make more sense in its Anglicized version, Ivor.