Great M Names for Girls

I love the initial letter for female names and here are my favorites.
  1. Mab
    • Origin:

      Irish, English
    • Meaning:

      "intoxicating"
    • Description:

      An Anglicized form of Medb borrowed by both Shakespeare and Percy Bysshe Shelley for the of queen of the fairies. Perfect if you want something both adventurous and simple.
  2. Mabel
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Amabel, Latin
    • Meaning:

      "lovable"
    • Description:

      Mabel is a saucy Victorian favorite rising in popularity in the US over the past decade, after a 50-year nap If you love offbeat old-fashioned names like Violet or Josephine, only sassier, Mabel is one for you to consider.
  3. Madeira
    • Origin:

      Place-name
    • Description:

      Madeira is an island off Morocco where the wine comes from. Despite the alcohol association, Madeira has a gorgeous sound.
  4. Madelief
    • Origin:

      Dutch, '"daisy"
    • Meaning:

      "daisy"
    • Description:

      Madelief is an uncommon name but not unheard of in the Netherlands, where 123 girls were called Madelief in one recent year. With its soft sounds and similarities to all those "Madeleine" type names as well as names ending in "eef/eev" sounds (Aoife, Eve, Genevieve), Madelief has potential in English-speaking countries to be a fresh and pleasant change from Daisy, Margaret and Madeleine.
  5. Madge
    • Origin:

      Diminutive of Margery or Margaret
    • Meaning:

      "pearl"
    • Description:

      A super diminutive nickname name, and sometime Madonna nickname – it was how the British tabloids referred to her when she moved to London in the 1990s, which she found annoying until then husband Guy Ritchie said it stood for 'Your Majesty'. Madge Undersee is Katniss's best friend in The Hunger Games books.
  6. Maeve
    • Origin:

      Irish
    • Meaning:

      "she who intoxicates"
    • Description:

      Maeve is a short and sweet name that has become one of the most stylish Irish names for girls in the modern US. Maeve would make an excellent first or middle name choice, with more heft than Mae/May and more modern charm than Mavis.
  7. Magdala
    • Magdalen
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "woman from Magdala or high tower"
      • Description:

        Biblical name long associated with the fallen-yet-redeemed Mary Magdalen, now rising improbably into the ranks of the fashionable among parents hungry for classic yet distinctive girls' names. The Magdalene and Magdalena versions are perhaps even more stylish. Can be shortened to Maggie or Magda but the full version is prettiest. One of our new favorites!
    • Magenta
      • Origin:

        Color name
      • Description:

        Magenta is a vivid Crayola color name, that could make a vivid, colorful choice. It was named in 1859 after the Napoleonic Battle of Magenta, a town in Northern Italy.
    • Maggie
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Margaret
      • Meaning:

        "pearl"
      • Description:

        Maggie is a cute, earthy short form that has been in style for several decades now, still sometimes used as an independent name by such parents as Jon Stewart. First used in Scotland, it got a large bump in popularity via the 1971 Rod Stewart hit song "Maggie May." Today's Maggie might just as well be short for a more adventurous name such as Magdalena or Magnolia as for the classic Margaret.

        Maggie Gyllenhaal was born Margaret.

    • Mahogany
      • Origin:

        Spanish
      • Meaning:

        "rich, strong"
      • Description:

        Dark, woody name that's brings to mind rich panelling, beautiful colors and luxury.
    • Maida
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "maiden"
      • Description:

        Old English name as outmoded as the use of the word maid for a young girl.
    • Majorca
      • Origin:

        Spanish place name
      • Description:

        Pronounced my-ORK-a, the name of this lovely Balearic Island, located in the Mediterranean, is one of the prettiest and most feminine of place names. The Spanish spelling is MALLORCA.
    • Malia
      • Origin:

        Hawaiian variation of Mary
      • Meaning:

        "bitter"
      • Description:

        Malia rose up the charts back in 2009 when it was brought into the spotlight as the name of the Obama's eldest daughter. It leapt into the US Top 200, and while it hasn't reached that level of popularity again, it now sees steady usage, and is given to around 1100 girls every year.
    • Malvina
      • Origin:

        Scottish
      • Meaning:

        "smooth-browed one"
      • Description:

        An invention of the eighteenth-century romantic poet James Macpherson, in his epic cycle about Ossian, a legendary Celtic hero. In Poland, where it was popular at the start of the 20th century, the spelling is Malwina, and it's also had some use in other Eastern European countries.
    • Mamie
      • Origin:

        Diminutive of Mary or Margaret
      • Description:

        Mamie is back. Having finally shorn her Mamie Eisenhower bangs, this insouciant and adorable nickname name is perfect if you want a zestier way to honor a beloved aunt Mary. Meryl Streep's actress daughter, properly named Mary Willa, is called Mamie Gummer. You might think of Mamie as a sister of the stylish Maisie.
    • Manette
      • Origin:

        French, diminutive of Marie
      • Description:

        Manette might be a fresh way to spin Mary or Marie, but popular French Manon has more grace and heft. Manet takes Manette in an artistic direction.
    • Marbella
      • Origin:

        Spanish place name
      • Description:

        The name of the resort city on Spain's Costa del Sol is pronounced mar-BAY-a, setting it apart from the bella-name competition -- though many English speakers won't realize that.
    • Marcella
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "warlike"
      • Description:

        Marcella has been in mothballs for so long it's starting to feel stylish again. Depicted as the world's most beautiful woman in Don Quixote (where it's spelled Marcela), this long neglected name seemed dated for decades but just might be ready for restoration.
    • Margery
      • Origin:

        Medieval variation of Margaret
      • Meaning:

        "pearl"
      • Description:

        An old royal name in England and Scotland that's also spelled Marjorie. Popular in the Middle Ages and Tudor period, it was revived at the end of the 19th century, peaked in 1921 and dropped off the list in 1958, enough time to be reconsidered as a Margaret alternative. The name Margery Daw is familiar via the seesaw nursery rhyme and Margery Williams wrote the children's classic The Velveteen Rabbit..