Boys

  1. Albus
    • Origin:

      Latin
    • Meaning:

      "white, bright."
    • Description:

      The ancient name Albus has modern currency as the first name of the headmaster of Harry Potter's Hogwarts, more formally known as Professor Albus Percival Wulfric Brian Dumbledore. Can Albus work if you're missing the long white beard and the magic wand? Maybe, though it might be a heavy mantle for a Muggle child to wear.
  2. Alexander
    • Origin:

      Greek
    • Meaning:

      "defending men"
    • Description:

      Alexander has been in a Top 25 boys' name in the US for 30 years now. But namers are still attracted to its imposing historic pedigree.
  3. Alfred
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "wise counselor; elf counsel"
    • Description:

      Alfred is up off his recliner! If you're looking for a path to Fred, you can go directly to Frederick or take the long way around with the so-out-it's-in-again Alfred. Alfred is quite popular in several European countries, especially England and Wales, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.
  4. Archer
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "bowman"
    • Description:

      Archer is an Anglo-Saxon surname that feels more modern than most because of its on-target occupational and Hunger Games associations. And it's a nice way to bypass the clunky Archibald to get to the cool nickname Archie.
  5. Arrow
    • Origin:

      Word name
    • Description:

      Words are not always easy to translate into baby names, but the implications of being straight and swift lend this one great potential as a name. It also has the popular o-sound ending, which brings it further into the realm of possibility. Rising rock star Aja Volkman pulled a gender switch when she named her daughter Arrow Eve.
  6. Arthur
    • Origin:

      Celtic
    • Meaning:

      " bear"
    • Description:

      Arthur, once the shining head of the Knights of the Round Table, is, after decades of neglect, now being polished up and restored by stylish parents, inspired perhaps by the new generation of royals. Arthur has led the list of possible names for the young British princes, chosen as a middle name for Prince Louis, son of William and Catherine, Prince and Princess of Wales.
  7. Aragorn
    • Basil
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "royal"
      • Description:

        Although Greek in origin--in the fourth century, a bishop by that name established the principles of the Greek Orthodox Church--Basil for years took on the aura of aquiline-nosed upper-class Britishness of Sherlock Holmes portrayer Basil Rathbone, then spiced with the fragrant aroma of the herb that entered with the Pesto generation.
    • Bryn
      • Origin:

        Welsh
      • Meaning:

        "hill"
      • Description:

        The simple and attractive Bryn is well used for boys in Wales, and does have a history as a male name in the US, although both Bryn and Brynn are currently far more popular for girls.
    • Callum
      • Origin:

        Scottish form of Columba, Latin
      • Meaning:

        "dove"
      • Description:

        Callum, a charming Scottish name high on the list in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, is rising through the ranks in the US now too. And it comes complete with the easy nickname Cal.
    • Caspian
      • Origin:

        Place name
      • Meaning:

        "white"
      • Description:

        One of the most romantic of appellations, Caspian is a geographical name referring to the large salty sea between Asia and Europe. It's also the name of the hero of C.S. Lewis's beloved Chronicles of Narnia, Prince Caspian.
    • Cedric
      • Origin:

        Celtic
      • Meaning:

        "bounty"
      • Description:

        Cedric was invented by Sir Walter Scott for the noble character of the hero's father in Ivanhoe, presumed to be an altered form of the Saxon name Cerdic. The name was later also given to Little Lord Fauntleroy, the long-haired, velvet-suited, and lace-collared boy hero of the Frances Hodgson Burnett book, who became an unwitting symbol of the pampered mama's boy.
    • Charles
      • Origin:

        French from German
      • Meaning:

        "man, free man"
      • Description:

        Charles derives from the Germanic name Karl, meaning "man" or "freeman", and is a royal name in multiple European countries. A famous early bearer is Charlemagne, King of the Franks and Lombards and then Roman Emperor in the 8th-9th centuries.
    • Charlie
      • Origin:

        English, diminutive of Charles
      • Meaning:

        "free man"
      • Description:

        Charlie derives, of course, from the classic name Charles which, in turn, comes from a German word meaning "free man." Charles became very popular in France during the Middle Ages due to the fame of Charles the Great, also known as Charlemagne. Charley is an alternate spelling.
    • Chaucer
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "maker of breeches"
      • Description:

        One of the most distinguished names in literature could become a hero name in a family of poetry-lovers -- or be seen as a trendy new occupational name.
    • Chester
      • Origin:

        Latin
      • Meaning:

        "fortress, walled town,"
      • Description:

        Chester is a comfortable, little-used teddy-bear of a name that suddenly sounds both quirky and cuddly.
    • Conall
      • Origin:

        Irish
      • Meaning:

        "strong as a wolf"
      • Description:

        Too many Connors in your neighborhood? This name--spelled with one 'l' or two--is equally authentic and much more unusual.
    • D'artagnan
      • Origin:

        French
      • Meaning:

        "from Artagnan"
      • Description:

        The least usable of the Three Musketeers names.
    • Dorian
      • Origin:

        Greek, name of a tribe
      • Description:

        The Dorians were an ancient Greek tribe, one of the three major pre-Spartan tribes. It literally means "of Doris," a Greek district, or "of Doros," referring to the son of Helen of Sparta. Dorian derives from the Greek doron, meaning "gift," along with related names such as Dorothy and Dora.
    • Edward
      • Origin:

        English
      • Meaning:

        "wealthy guardian"
      • Description:

        Unlike perennials William, John and James, Edward is a classic that moves in and out of fashion. This royal Anglo-Saxon standard has benefited in recent years from the popularity of the hot hero of the vampire sensation Twilight — Edward Cullen — who has given his name a new infusion of cool.