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Girl Names: For International Women’s Day

Alexandria, Amata and Ayanna

by Linda Rosenkrantz

Not only is March Women’s History Month, but today, March 8th,  is International Women’s Day.

So what better time than this to salute some of the women who are making history right now in the US political sphere?

When the 116th Congress recently convened, women made up almost a quarter of its voting members—by far the highest percentage in US history. And its freshman class is the most racially diverse, with a tsunami of firsts, including the first Native American and first Muslim congresswomen.

Here are some of the girl names that demonstrate that diversity, all possible baby names. Those in the freshman class are starred.

*Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez—US Representative from New York

The high-profile AOC quickly became a star of the Congressional freshman class after winning a startling upset in her primary and then becoming, at 29, the youngest woman ever to serve in the US Congress. ALEXANDRIA, the geographical variation of Alexandra, now ranks at #257, after being in the Top 100 in the 1990s.

Amata Radewagen—Delegate to the US House of Representatives from American Samoa

Amata Catherine Coleman Radewagen holds the title of Aumua (talking chief) from the Village of Pago Pago. Upon taking political office in 2015, she became the Republican Party’s highest ranking Asian Pacific federal officeholder, serving on Natural Resources, Small Business and Veterans’ Affairs Committees. The underused AMATA, one of the cool names that mean beloved, has been used by J.K. Rowling in one of her non-Potter books.

*Ayanna Pressley— US Representative from Massachusetts.

The first black woman elected to Congress from Massachusetts, Ayanna Soyini Pressley has introduced an amendment to lower the voting age from 18 to 16. AYANNA, a variant spelling of the cross-cultural Ayana, was on the US pop list from 1971 to 2014, peaking at #361.

Chellie Pingree—US Rep from Maine

Born Rochelle Marie Johnson, she legally changed her name to Chellie as a teenager. As a Maine Senator, Pingree gained national attention by authoring the nation’s first bill regulating prescription drug prices. Other goals include working toward health care reform, women’s rights and clean energy.

*Jahana Hayes—US Rep from Connecticut

Jahana Flemming Hayes, once recognized as National Teacher of the Year, is the first African American woman to represent her state in Congress and is active in educational issues. JAHANA is the female form of Jahan, a Persian word meaning ‘world’ or ‘universe’.

Kamala Harris—US Senator from California

Kamala Devi Harris previously served as California’s District Attorney; in 2016 she succeeded Senator Barbara Boxer, becoming California’s third female US Senator and the first of Jamaican or Indian ancestry. She has recently launched a Presidential campaign. The name KAMALA comes from the Sanskrit word for the lotus flower.

*Kendra Horn–US Rep from Oklahoma

Kendra Suzanne Horn caused one of the biggest upsets in the midterm elections; she is part of the Blue Dog Coalition of moderate and conservative Democrats. KENDRA, now ranking at #431, entered the Top 200 in 2013, before it started to drop. It is the name of Albus Dumbledore’s mother and was also a character on Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Mazie Hirono—Senator from Hawaii

Mazie Keiko Hirono is the Japanese-born American Junior Senator from Hawaii, the first elected female senator from Hawaii and the first Asian-American woman elected to the Senate. Her name, the appealingly streamlined spelling MAZIE, had been worn by a fictional Tillie Olsen character. Could join a list of  a cool names.

Nita Lowey—US Rep from New York

Nita Sue Melnikoff Lowey was elected to the House of Representatives in 1988, later becoming the first Chairwoman of the House Appropriations Committee. As well as being a shortening of Anita, NITA is a Hindi girl name meaning bear. Nita Naldi was an iconic American silent film star.

Nydia Velazquez–US Rep from New York

Nydia Margarita Velasquez Serrano is the first Puerto Rican woman to be elected to Congress and was chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, a great advocate for the human and civil rights of the Puerto Rican people and American Hispanics. NYDIA is a Latin name meaning home and makes an interesting alternative to Lydia.

*Rashida Tlaib—US Rep from Michigan

Rashida Harbi Tiaib, the eldest of 14 children, is one of the first two Muslim women elected to Congress and the first Palestinian-American.  RASHIDA, an Arabic baby name meaning righteous, is also currently associated with the actress Rashida Jones, daughter of Quncy.

Tulsi Gabbard—US Rep from Hawaii

More firsts: Gabbard is the first Samoan-American and first Hindu member of the US Congress. She is seeking the Democratic nomination for President in 2020. The name TULSI comes from the Sanskrit name for “holy basil,” a plant sacred in Hinduism.

*Xochitl Torres Small—US Rep from New Mexico

Xochitl Liana Torres Small holds leadership positions on the Committees on Armed Services and Homeland Security. XOCHITL (pronounced SOH-chee) is an Aztec girl name meaning flower and is commonly heard in southern Mexico. It’s currently #512 on Nameberry.

 

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9 Responses to “Girl Names: For International Women’s Day”

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beynotce Says:

March 8th, 2019 at 8:21 am

Cortez, Coleman, Hayes, Harris, Lowey–there are lots of surnames here that might better suit a son but still honor these awesome women!

justthinkin Says:

March 8th, 2019 at 3:25 pm

What I love about this list is how it debunks the myth that one needs a traditional or classic Western name to be taken seriously or as a professional. In the twenty-first century you can be in Congress, President even, with a unique name.

holloway Says:

March 9th, 2019 at 3:21 pm

Possibly because of the 102 women currently serving in the House 89 of them are Democrats. Just because they’re politics don’t fit with your belief doesn’t mean that they aren’t strong women in positions of power who are trying to fight fir what they believe will make the world better.

Bobcat108 Says:

March 9th, 2019 at 8:06 pm

Thumbs up, holloway!

jenni_lynn91 Says:

March 9th, 2019 at 9:45 pm

I love seeing a woman in politics named Xochitl. My almost 5 year old is proud of her middle name.

I also love the names Ayanna, Kamala, and Nydia.

lee_augusta Says:

March 10th, 2019 at 3:58 pm

The majority of the newly-elected women in Congress are Democrats, and the majority of women in this country support reproductive freedom and a strong social safety net in order to support the most vulnerable children at every stage of development. Your injection of politics into a neutral (and excellent!) post is frankly bizarre. Are you doing okay?

ashbee Says:

March 10th, 2019 at 5:00 pm

People who support reproductive health and freedom (including abortion) are not against babies. I myself am pro-choice and love babies. People chose to have abortions for many difficult reasons.

Bobcat108 Says:

March 10th, 2019 at 5:49 pm

Here’s a link to women’s rights activists from all over the world, both past & present. The list does include men as well, but the majority of names are women.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_women%27s_rights_activists

Pam Says:

March 10th, 2019 at 5:55 pm

I removed some comments because this is not the place for political debates. Thanks everyone else for the good thoughts.

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