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Names that Peaked in 1885

  1. RenaHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "joyous melody"
    • Description:

      Rena is a Hebrew name all on its own but may also be an abbreviation of Irene or any name that ends in rena or rene or reen. Also spelled Rina.
  2. ValentineHeart
    • Origin:

      French variation of Valentina
    • Meaning:

      "strength, health"
    • Description:

      For a girl, we'd say Val-en-teen, though many would insist on pronouncing it like the holiday.
  3. WilhelmHeart
    • Origin:

      German variation of William
    • Meaning:

      "resolute protection"
    • Description:

      This dignified German form of William belonged to two German Emperors and Kings of Prussia, as well as a host of other important historical figures. These include composer (Wilhelm) Richard Wagner, philosophers Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche, mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz, and physicist Wilhelm Roentgen, who discovered the X-ray. It now sounds rather dated in Germany, however, having dropped out of the Top 20 there in the late 1920s and continuing to decline since.
  4. HansHeart
    • Origin:

      German, Dutch, and Scandinavian, diminutive of Johannes
    • Description:

      Though familiar to all via such childhood icons as Hans Brinker, Hans(el) and Gretel, and Hans Christian Andersen, few Americans have chosen this name for their sons because of its intractably Old Country image.
  5. SmithHeart
    • Origin:

      English occupational name
    • Meaning:

      "blacksmith"
    • Description:

      Even if it is the Number one surname in the U.S.--with more than 2.5 million bearers--we still think that Smith would make a cool first or middle name, whether or not it has family history.
  6. HoseaHeart
    • Origin:

      Hebrew
    • Meaning:

      "salvation"
    • Description:

      Since so many of the biblical prophet names -- Daniel, Jonah, Nathan, Samuel -- are overused, you might want to consider this distinctive alternative. Hosea was the author of the book of prophesies bearing his name, whose underlying message was a promise of restoration. The Talmud claims that he was the greatest prophet of his generation.
  7. AmaHeart
    • Origin:

      Akan, Ghanaian, Cherokee
    • Meaning:

      "born on a Saturday; water"
    • Description:

      Ama is a day name used by the Akan people of Ghana for girls born on Saturday. Names that reference a baby's birth by day of the week, time of day, or season of the year are common in many African cultures. Ama is one that can be used happily by parents who live in English-speaking countries.
  8. NelleHeart
    • Origin:

      Spelling variation of Nell
    • Description:

      Nelle, pronounced as the one-syllable Nell though some may think it's Nellie or Nella, is the elegant form of the name used by author Nelle Harper Lee, who wrote To Kill A Mockingbird. With whatever spelling, Nell/Nelle is a charming old-fashioned nickname name -- it was originally short for Ellen, Eleanor, or Helen -- that never took off the way sisters Molly and Maggie did.
  9. ArleyHeart
    • Origin:

      English
    • Meaning:

      "from the rabbit meadow"
    • Description:

      Sounds a bit like Harley pronounced with a cockney accent.
  10. CampbellHeart
    • Origin:

      Scottish
    • Meaning:

      "crooked mouth"
    • Description:

      The seventh most common surname in Scotland, once associated only with soup, is now being considered as a last-name-first choice, accessible but unusual.
  11. OlafHeart
    • Origin:

      Norse
    • Meaning:

      "ancestor's relic"
    • Description:

      Olaf, though sainted and regal in Norway, is slightly oafish here. It is one of those names that has become completely familiar in the U.S. without ever becoming assimilated. Now that he's a comical character in Disney's Frozen, he might get some more attention.
  12. LenHeart
    • ClotildeHeart
      • Origin:

        Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese
      • Meaning:

        "famous in battle"
      • Description:

        A romantic rarity, derived from the Old German name Chlotichilda, meaning "famous in battle." Saint Clotilde was a Frankish queen, wife of Clovis I, who played a role in the spread of Christianity.
    • MollieHeart
      • Origin:

        Variation of Molly
      • Description:

        This new/old spin on Molly -- nickname-names with the ie ending were particularly popular at the turn of the last century -- that has landed this name in the US Top 1000.
    • MedoraHeart
      • Origin:

        Greek
      • Meaning:

        "mother's gift"
      • Description:

        Medora is a Greek name much less common here than, say, Melanie or Melissa. It has some literary references, including as the beautiful and passionate heroine of Lord Byron's poem The Corsair, and in Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence, there is a character named Marchioness Melora Manson.
    • FieldingHeart
      • Origin:

        English topographical surname
      • Description:

        Fielding isn't an occupational name, exactly, though it does relate to someone who works in or lives in a Field. Although there have been a handful of people, real and fictional, with the first name Fielding, the most famous Fielding is eighteenth century writer Henry Fielding, author of Tom Jones.
    • ReasonHeart
      • Origin:

        Word name
      • Description:

        Provocative word name that may strike the right chord for an adventurous baby namer.
    • EnosHeart
      • Origin:

        Hebrew
      • Meaning:

        "mankind"
      • Description:

        A thundering biblical name - belonging to a grandson of Adam and Eve, also known as Enosh - that hasn't made as much of a comeback as similar Enoch. Enos is also a book in the Book of Mormon, and the name of the first chimpanzee to go into orbit. Caution: depending on your accent, it could have one or two unfortunate rhymes.
    • MignonHeart
      • Origin:

        French
      • Meaning:

        "delicate, dainty"
      • Description:

        Charming French endearment, first used as a name by Goethe, that now makes an appealing choice -- though the proper feminine form is Mignonne. Note, though, that this is not actually used as a name in France, where Manon would be the closest choice.
    • FredericHeart
      • Origin:

        French variation of Frederick, German
      • Meaning:

        "peaceful ruler"
      • Description:

        Dropping the final "k" of Frederick definitely makes it a more user-friendly classic boys' name. It streamlines it and also hints at Frederic's status as a French variation of the Germanic Frederick. Either way, this is a strong classic to consider if you're not afraid of a little dusty residue.