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Category: Trends and Predictions

b3

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Brian is your brother-in-law, Bill’s your uncle, and Barbara is your mom.  But could B be the new letter to watch for baby names?

Up until recently we were all mad for Aiden and Ava, Amelia and AlexanderA was the most popular letter for girls’ names, the second most popular for boys, and a resounding #1 overall.

Of course, B hasn’t been in the shadows.  You probably know kids called Benjamin and Brayden, Brooklyn, Brianna and Bella.  They’re all Top 100 choices. Up-and-comers like Beatrix and Beckett are on the favorites list of many a future parent.

Still, it was a surprise to hear four great B choices in the news this week, all of which could catch on.  They were mixed in with lots of intriguing names: a vintage romantic, a pair of Hollywood glam surnames, and a handsome Greek god.

Here are the baby names in this week’s news, brought to you by the letter B and beyond:

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The Next Baby Name Style Wave

future-baby

by Pamela Redmond Satran

You have only to look at the popularity lists to know which names are used most widely now.  There’s Sophia, Isabella, Emma, and Olivia for girls; Jacob, Mason, and Ethan for boys.  Which reminds us: Have you seen our new, searchable U.S. Top 1000 list?  It’s awesome; have a peek.

Beyond the most popular names are the names we might think of as most stylish today.  These are represented on the Nameberry Top 1000 list, which gauges the names that are viewed most often on our site, updated monthly.  While the U.S. Top 1000 list tallies names used most frequently for babies born in 2012, the Nameberry Top 1000 surveys names capturing the most interest from prospective parents in 2014 — so it’s more theoretical, and up-to-date.

Based on the Nameberry list, we’d place the following baby names atop the current style wave.  What many of them lack in popularity, they make up for in stylishness.

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ev2

By Linda Rosenkrantz

For some time now we’ve been seeing a profusion of soft El-starting names, from Ella to Eleanor, Eloise, Elliot, Ellery, Elodie, et al.  And now we’ve begun to notice some of her stronger, sharper, Ev-starting cousins coming into the picture, ranging from the ancient Eve to the nouveau Everest.

EveThe simple, strong, Biblical Eve is clearly the mother of this family of names, with remarkable vigor for a three-letter name.  It derives from the Hebrew word for “living” and was named by Adam ‘because she was the mother of all living,” and is now ranking at 558.  Clive Owen is among the parents of an Eve.

EvaEva, the Latin form of Eve, is now a Top 100 name, perhaps gaining from some Ava-overflow from Ava, and influenced by the popularity of Eva Longoria and a few other sexy stars. It’s a true international favorite—Number 7 in the Netherlands, 13 in Scotland and 25 in England, and is pronounced as, yes, Ava in several cultures. One Ev-name that isn’t getting much love is Eva’s pet form, Evita, which hasn’t shaken its string connection to the longtime Argentine First Lady, Eva/Evita Peron.

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abby 3-3-14a

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

You’ll never guess the name that repeats in my son’s third grade.

It isn’t Alex.  Despite having a Top 20 name, he’s never had to share.  His friend Matthew is also one of one, and has been since kindergarten.  The same is true for Chloe and William.

The name that repeats?  Micah.

It’s one of the new realities of baby naming.  In our quest to avoid calling our kids the 2014 equivalent of Jennifer and Jason, Ashley and Josh, we skip over the Top Ten and even Top 100.

But that’s no guarantee that our relatively uncommon choice won’t be shared.  My kids know more than one Lucia and a couple of Finns, two Jareds, a Skyler and a Skye, a boy Jordan and a girl Jordan, a boy Seamus and a dog Seamus.

So it isn’t really a surprise that the high profile birth announcement name to repeat this week wasn’t Ava or Isabella, but Bodhi.

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posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
invented glinda

By Angela Mastrodonato, Upswing Baby Names

With names, as with other subjects, once I learned my assumptions were wrong, I was put in my place.

Pre-kids, I was a name-snob who openly expressed disdain for invented names, grouping all invented names with experimental spellings, and modern word-play creations such as Abcde (ab-si-dee) and La-A (la-dash-ah).

And then shortly after my daughter was born, I discovered I had unintentionally given her an invented name.

No, I didn’t invent the name. The name was invented by an author, and they seem to have a knack for inventing great names. One author known as a master-namer is Shakespeare.

My daughter’s name, Fiona, was first used (and believed to have been invented) by Scottish poet James Macpherson in the 18th century.

Other established names invented by authors are Janice and Vanessa. Certain there must be more author-invented names, I set out to find them.

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