Victorian Royal Baby Names

Queen Victoria named six of nine children after either herself or her husband Prince Albert, making the royal baby names from the 19th and early 20th centuries a cozy bunch. The full list of royal names from the Victorian era includes:
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  • Josepha

    Gender: F LoveDislike

    Josepha is less heard in this country than in other parts of the world, seen as a slightly awkward feminization a la Ricarda and Benjamina. In the U.S., Josephine or Joanna is the more usual... Read More 

  • Kate

    Gender: F LoveDislike

    Kate, in the headlines via Catherine Middleton, has been as pervasive as Kathy was in the 1950s and 1960s, both as a nickname for Katherine and Kaitlyn and as a strong, classic stand-alone name. ... Read More 

  • Leopold

    Gender: M LoveDislike

    This aristocratic, somewhat formal Germanic route to the popular Leo is a royal name: Queen Victoria used it to honor a favorite uncle, King Leopold of Belgium. Though Leopold sounds as if it... Read More 

  • Livingstone

    Gender: M LoveDislike

  • Lord

    Gender: M LoveDislike

    If it's royalty you're after, stick with Earl or Prince -- this is too deified. Read More 

  • Louise

    Gender: F LoveDislike

    Louise has for several decades now been seen as competent, studious, and efficient—desirable if not dramatic qualities. But now along with a raft of other L names, as well as cousin... Read More 

  • Ludwig

    Gender: M LoveDislike

    As heavy as a marble bust of Beethoven. Read More 

  • Luise

    Gender: F LoveDislike

    See LOUISE. Read More 

  • Margaret

    Gender: F LoveDislike

    Margaret is a rich, classic name used for queens and saints. Margaret was replaced for decades by less starchy forms like Maggie and Meg, but some stylish parents are reviving Margaret in full,... Read More 

  • Marie

    Gender: F LoveDislike

    The ubiquitous French version of Mary came into the English-speaking world in the nineteenth century. In the United States, Marie was a huge hit at the turn of the last century and for the ensuing... Read More 

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