Category: Welsh baby names

posted by: ClareB View all posts by this author
Welsh literary names

By Clare Bristow

Welsh names can be divisive. Some people love them for their look, sound and cultural associations, while others run screaming from the unfamiliar spelling and pronunciation.

In this post we’ll look at some of the oldest Welsh literary names, and I hope you’ll find them surprisingly usable.

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Rowan memorial

By Sarah Linke Mezzini

In tribute to the much respected, admired and missed ‘Rowangreeneyes,’ her friend and fellow Berry offers this summing up of Blaire Emerson‘s fascination with and unique taste in names.

Blaire Irwin Emerson, better known here as Rowangreeneyes, joined Nameberry not long after the birth of her daughter, Rowan Jane, in 2011. As a self-confessed name nerd, she was keen on finding names for her future second child. She loved many different types of names, particularly boys’ names on girls, which she became famous for within the Nameberry community. Her other loves included international names (particularly Welsh), nature names, Southern names and word names. At the time of her passing, she was 35 weeks pregnant with her second child. In remembrance of Blaire, here are some of her favourites.

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posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
British baby names

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

What names are quintessentially ‘British’?

I see this question a lot but it’s a hard one to pin down. Do we mean solely British in origin, or only British in use? When Prince George was born our media heralded it as a “quintessentially British” name — and why not? We’ve had numerous kings bear the name, and it’s even the name of the patron saint of England. But George was originally a Greek name, brought late into our Royalty by German Hanovarians. Ask many Americans and the first George they think of is Washington or Bush.

For me, the quintessentially British names are those which are very familiar to us as a nation, that have been or are currently popular, but are little used in America, Canada, Australia and other English-speaking countries. Names such as Nicola – our darling of the 70s – Darcy, Imogen, Poppy, Freya, Alfie, Jenson, Gareth, Alistair and Finlay.

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walesx

by Linda Rosenkrantz

If you’re looking for a name that reflects your Welsh roots, or simply find the soft sound of names from Wales appealing, there are several possible ways to go.  You could consider Welsh names that have long been used in the US—some of which have far from obvious roots. Then there those currently popular in Wales which have never made their way through US immigration. And, finally, some other, interesting Welsh names worth considering, including some Welsh versions of classics.

WELSH NAMES WITH US CITIZENSHIP

Girls

Branwen

Bronwen

Enid

Gladys

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elea2

British name maven Eleanor Nickerson, aka Elea, has her finger on the pulse of naming trends in the UK.

For most people outside of the UK, “British Names” are typified by the old Victorian legacy of Empire and afternoon tea, or the ethereal mystery of ancient Celtic folklore. The stereotype often favours rarefied aristocratic favourites such as Percival and Araminta, or tongue-twisting indigenous Gaelic choices like Aonghus or Caoimhe.

If you look at the most popular names that are actually used in Britain today you will see a much more varied picture. Like other Western countries there is a large influence from film and television, a popular cult of celebrity, and a growing awareness of global fashions (yes, we have many Neveahs and Jaydens, too).  And yet, even in our modernised naming practices, British trends still manage to make a subtle nod to history in a style that feels quite unique.

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