Category: vintage names for girls

Vintage Baby Names: Gone girls of 1916

lost girls of 1916

Sometimes it feels as though our attics have been completely cleared out of stored vintage baby names. But every time we go back up there we do manage to succeed in finding a number of past treasures that haven’t been dusted off yet. The names shown here were all in the Top 1000 in 1916, one hundred years ago, several in the top half of the list and many of them not seen again for fifty years. Let’s see if the Hundred Year Rule applies and they’re ready for a comeback.

By Linda Rosenkrantz

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Fresh Vintage Baby Names for Girls

vintage girl baby names

By Abby Sandel

The best thing about vintage baby names is that there are always new ones to consider. Emma, Clara, and Alice were big in the 1890s, and all are in style in 2016, too.

Looking for baby names for girls that are equally vintage, but less common? Names like Dorothy, Ruth, and Marjorie were darlings of the 1920s, and are all on the upswing now, too – but all are outside of the Top 300.

Lately vintage baby names for girls have been in the news, with an appealing mix of relatively uncommon possibilities making headlines.

Let’s take a look at the antique appellations chosen by parents for their daughters in recent weeks, all vintage baby names for girls.

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Vintage Name or Nickname?

vintage nicknames for girls

The names collected here are a charming group of vintage choices for girls. The other thing that unites them is that they all originated as short forms and yet can stand on their own. That means you can either use them as nicknames for more formal names or put them proudly on the birth certificate. Let’s consider the options.

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
1940s girls names

By Anna Otto, Waltzing More Than Matilda

The most popular girls names of the 1940s were Margaret, Patricia, Judith, and Helen, but what were the least popular names? Here are ten names which were only chosen once in any year between 1944 and 1949 in South Australia, making them unique for their time and place. They continue to be rare, and some parents will still find them appealing.

Avis
Thought to be a Latinised form of the Germanic name Aveza, most likely a long form or elaboration of the familiar Ava. Introduced to England by the Normans, it was reasonably common in the Middle Ages, and quickly became associated with the Latin word avis, meaning “bird”. Avis Rent a Car was founded in the 1940s by Warren Avis, but did not become big in Australia for some time – it’s now quite difficult to disassociate the name Avis from the rental company, although it’s very much on trend and still seems contemporary and pretty. It was also a good fit in the 1940s, when names such as Avril and Averil were fashionable.

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vintage nicknames

By Pamela Redmond Satran

Nickname-names still appear on birth certificates.  In the U.S., such names as Ellie, Abby, and Charlie for girls; Jake, Jack, and Johnny for boys all rank high.  In the U.K., nickname-names are even more fashionable, with Evie, Maisie, Millie, and Ellie in the Top 35 for girls, and Jack, Charlie, and Alfie in the boys’ Top 10.

But there are generations of nickname-names that have fallen off the Top 1000, yet sound cute and baby-ready today.  The list here is drawn from names that were on the Social Security roster on their own in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but fell off by the early 1970s (the date of their last listing follows the name) and haven’t yet reappeared.

Whether you choose to use Bea or Mamie, Clem or Zeb as full names or as diminutives for Beatrice or Marietta, Clement or Zebediah, any of these nickname-names would make charming choices.

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