Category: unusual nature names

12 Unique Nature Names for Boys

unique nature names for boys

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Nature names are a lush and varied category, and one that’s expanding all the time. The most visible nature names tend to be on the girls’ side: the popular flower names such as Lily and Violet along with tree names like Willow and bird names such as Wren.

Of course there are a handful of popular nature names for boys too: River, for instance, is Number 244, and tree-related Oliver and Ashton both rank high in the charts.

But there are many more intriguing nature names for boys that are unusual, lying outside the Top 1000. And some amazing nature names for boys are truly one-of-a-kind.

Here are a dozen cool and unique boys’ nature names to consider:

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Unique Nature Names for Girls

nature names for girls

By Pamela Redmond Satran

Nature baby names have blossomed in popularity in recent years, especially for girls. Flower names such as Lily and Violet share the spotlight in the Top 100 with other nature-inspired names such as Autumn, Ruby, and Hazel.

But one of the most exciting thing about nature names is how wide and deep they run. There are so many categories, from flowers to trees to gems to water to earth to sky to weather and animals, that thousands of names qualify as nature-inspired. There are nature names that come out and say what they mean, such as Coral and Cloud, and then there are those whose relationship to nature is hidden. And of course many of all those types of nature names are highly unusual.

Today we look at 12 unique — sometimes literally — nature names for girls.

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posted by: Dantea View all posts by this author
dantaee

By Angel Thomas, aka Dantea

Perusing through the Nameberry database, it occurred to me that all the nature names are pretty straightforward, normal names. So, in my never-ending search for unheard of names, I discovered these nature names that aren’t to be found there that I think are ripe for the picking. Since they’re nature names, I won’t separate them into gender categories since technically, all nature names should be unisex, but I will express my preference.

Aletris – Otherwise known as Colic Root, Blazing Star, Unicorn Root, and Stargrass, this is a flowering plant whose roots are used to make medicine. The flowers are tiny, delicate wide bells. The root is used for digestive problems (including colic), muscle problems, and some women use it to prevent miscarriage, though I wouldn’t recommend it without a doctor’s permission. As a name, I think it’s very cool. It sounds like it could fit into the ‘ancient name’ revival trend, or the ‘boyish names on girls’ trend as it does have a sort of masculine sound. For boys, it’s got the nickname Al and for girls there’s Allie and Lettie.

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fruit baby names

In the never-ending search for fresh green nature names, prospective parents have dug all around the flower garden, looked up at tree names and swum through a sea of water names.

One area of nature names that hasn’t been explored as much is –don’t laugh—fruit names.  Maybe this was because there was so much (perhaps unfair) snickering when Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin named their baby girl Apple, even though there were some who liked the fresh-faced, wholesome image it projected.

We’re not suggesting that you call your baby Banana (the pen name of a noted Japanese novelist) or Prune (which happens to be really popular in France these days), but if you look beyond the common fruit names to some of their specific varieties and international variations, you might be surprised to find some interesting—and unusual– nature name choices.

Such as:

ANJOU—The Anjou is a type of sweet and juicy pear, which originated in Belgium but takes its name from a wine-growing province in the Loire valley with a rich history that includes such characters as Geoffrey the Handsome.  As a name, Anjou has a charming Bijou-like feel, and might be seen as a cousin to Anjelica and Angelina.

BERRYBerry has long been used as a unisex first name reaching a high of Number 435 in 1909 and staying in the Top 100 till 1971. It has one male and one female well-known namesake—Motown founder Berry Gordy, Jr, and the late actress-photographer Berry Berenson (born Berinthia).

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