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Category: unisex baby names

palindromes (1)

If you’re looking for a name with perfect symmetry and balance, nothing could fit the bill better than a palindromic appellation, meaning one that reads the same backwards and forwards. Granted, that’s a pretty limited field, and a lot of the choices begin and end with the letter ‘a’ with only one consonant in-between, but there are a few others as well. Here are the most usable:

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Unisex Baby Names: Five new entries

posted by: bluejuniper View all posts by this author
uni

By Brooke Cussans, aka bluejuniper, of baby name pondering

Every year names move up and down, on and off the US Social Security Administration (SSA) charts of popular names. A name will appear on the charts if it has been given to more than four babies of one gender in that year. Usually when a name enters the lists, it enters for one gender first and takes some time to chart for the other one (if it ever does).

Take the now unisex name Cameo for example. Cameo first entered the girls chart in 1957. But it wasn’t until 1979 – more than 20 years later – that it started to chart for boys too. It also charts more irregularly for boys than it does for girls.

So it’s fair to say that it takes quite a special name to simultaneously enter both the boys and the girls charts for the first time in the same year. There is something about it that has captured the imagination of parents, who think it has a sound and feel that could work for either gender.

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unisex names

Unisex names most popular among Nameberry’s visitors include those that lean girlward and those more favored for boys.  To qualify as a unisex name for this list, a name needs to be given to at least 10 percent of the minority gender.

Check out the graphic on our new Unisex Names home page to get more specific statistics on how these names divide along gender lines.  Our Number 1 unisex name Quinn, for instance, is now 68 percent female, a dramatic swing toward the girls’ side thanks to its starring role on television’s Glee.  Number 2 Rowan, meanwhile, is 63 percent male.

Names such as Sawyer and Kai are predominantly male, edging toward our 90% cutoff, while choices such as Avery and Emery are more than 80% female.

This is a fascinating list, including names such as Charlie and Elliot that were long traditional male names and other choices such as Reese (Witherspoon) and Peyton (Manning) that are heavily identified with celebrities of one gender but are still used for babies of the other.

If you’re interested in these or other unisex names for your baby, be sure to check the gender progression over time on the chart on our Unisex Names page.

The Top 20 Unisex Names so far this year on Nameberry are:

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posted by: NameFreak! View all posts by this author
girlish boy

by Kelli Brady at namefreak!

As I go through the Top 100 girl names from the late 1800′s and early 1900′s, I notice that quite a few are the feminine form of male names. It’s noticeable because it is such a big difference from the current trend of unisex names. Most feminine form names have disappeared from the top in favor of names that either are unisex or were originally male names. Take a look:

Top 100 from 1880-1930
Twist on Male Names            Male/Unisex Names Given to Girls
Caroline                                              Billie
Charlotte                                            Carol
Georgia                                               Marion
Geraldine                                            Ollie
Jacqueline                                           Willie
Josephine
Leona
Louise
Maxine
Norma
Patricia
Pauline
Roberta

Top 100 from 2012
Twist on Male Names           Male/Unisex Names Given to Girls
Brianna                                                Ashley
Caroline                                               Aubrey
Charlotte                                             Avery
Makayla                                               Bailey
.                                                           Brooklyn
.                                                           Harper
.                                                           Kennedy
.                                                           Mackenzie
.                                                           Morgan
.                                                           Peyton
.                                                           Reagan
.                                                           Riley
.                                                           Skylar
.                                                           Sydney
.                                                           Taylor

It’s interesting to see the “masculine” preference change from a form of a masculine name to the actual masculine (or unisex) name.

How do you feel about the change in preference? Are there any feminine form names you wish would return to the Top 100?

Originally posted at NameFreak! on May 22, 2013 and revised for Nameberry.

Kelli Brady is a stay at home mom of two who needed an outlet for her name obsession. She found it at NameFreak!, a blog dedicated to a wide variety of name-related whims and fancies. You can also follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

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celebrity baby names

Not that this is something completely new.  After all, way back when, Diane Keaton named her daughter Dexter Dean, Kelsey Grammer had girls called Spencer and Mason, and Miley Cyrus’s parents named their next daughter Noah.  But lately the trend of celebrities giving their female offspring completely male— not unisex— names has been wildly escalating.  Here are some of the most extreme gender-benders. (And if you haven’t already, be sure to check out our great new graphic showing just where every unisex name stands on the boy-girl spectrum.)

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