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Category: UK baby names



20 UK Names We Should Steal

British faves

By Abby Sandel

The new top baby names for England and Wales came out recently. At first glance, American and British parents have a lot in common. We all love Jack and Emily, Isabella and James.

But the new UK Top 100 is packed with names that far more popular across the pond – including a few that are all but ignored by American parents.

Here are my picks for the British baby names that Americans should import.

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Cornish Baby Names

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Cornish baby names

By Aimee Gedge

Cornwall, a beautiful county and popular tourist destination in the southwest of England, has its own unique culture and even language, although it is spoken by fewer and fewer people. It is the legendary birthplace of King Arthur and many writers such as Daphne du Maurier have been inspired by the rugged coastlines and stunning beaches.

Here in Britain, Cornish names have gained notoriety lately as a result of the very successful TV drama Poldark, based on the book series of the same name and set in Cornwall during the late eighteenth century. With the news that a second series has been commissioned, here are a few traditional Cornish names for you to peruse.

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Most Popular British Names by Letter, 2013

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British name popularity

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names Are Amelia and Alfie the most popular British A names? You would be forgiven for thinking so, but the answer depends on where you live. Scots would say it’s Ava and Alexander, while Northern Ireland would quote Aoife and Adam. Though we are all held together by common trends, each part of the UK has its own regional favourites. Sophie, for example, holds sway as the most popular S girls’ name in most of Britain except Wales, where Seren is favourite. Northern Ireland likes Finn better than Finley, and Scotland prefers Brodie to Benjamin.

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British Baby Names: Hot New Trends


This was one of those delicious mornings when I allowed myself to dip into the recent British baby names in the London Telegraph birth announcements. As usual, they didn’t disappoint (can you tell that my speech has suddenly acquired a British cadence?) and I managed to pick up on some actual trends.

The first is that, now that Americans have started following the British lead and using two middle names, the Brits are upping the ante by using three. Four first names total, ala Charlie Gaspar Geoffrey Langton: that’s one major new trend.

But in another way, British parents have started imitating Americans by using surnames and word names as middle names: besides Langton, there’s a Macmillan, a Melrose, a Tiger and a Capability here.

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