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Category: surname names



42 Stylish Surname Names for Girls

stylish surnames for girls

By Abby Sandel

Madison has been a Top Ten choice for girls since 1997. Harper, Kennedy, and Hadley are racing up the charts.

Plenty of parents love surname names for girls.

With choices like Avery and Piper well established, it might feel like there aren’t any great new options for girls. Or maybe it seems like borrowing a favorite for boys, like Parker or Maxwell, is the only way to go.

Instead, why not consider some great, undiscovered surname names? Ones that we’re not using at all, but that have potential to wear well on a daughter.

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9 Ways to Choose an Unusual Baby Name

unusual baby names

By Abby Sandel

There’s more than one way to choose an unusual name.

Classics like William and Elizabeth are evergreen. And who doesn’t love Ava and Mason?

But if you think you’d like something different – maybe even dramatically different – for your child’s name, it can be tough to know where to start.

Here’s a road map with nine different paths to choose an unusual baby name. Celebrities are fond of each one of these strategies, but they’re not exclusive to Hollywood. Anyone can use these same approaches.

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Elea Berry Juice profile image

British Name Trends 2014

posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
British name trend

By Eleanor Nickerson, British Baby Names

Now that 2014 is coming to an end, here is a look at the main trends and influences that have proven popular in Britain in this eventful year.


The hottest sound this year is the undoubtedly ‘Ar’. Archie, Arthur, Martha and Arran in Scotland have already obtained top 100 status, but 2014 has also seen a rise in the likes of Arlo and Archer for boys and Arabella, Aria/Arya and Ariana  for girls.

Clara and Margot are two vintage ‘ar’ sound choices that have been gaining more attention this year, while the similar ‘Or’ sound has also bolstered Aurora, Aurelia and Scottish choices Orla and Rory.

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Occupational Surnames: Far from a fad

posted by: Nick View all posts by this author
occupational surnames

By Nick Turner

Back in 2012, I heard about parents naming their babies Draper in honor of Mad Men. I remember thinking the idea was daring but a little silly. These people were taking the last-name-as-first-name trend to an absurd conclusion, I griped.

It had been a few years since occupational surnames like Cooper and Mason had become popular, and I worried that pretty soon every kid would be a Fletcher, Tanner or Jagger. Traditional names were a dying species.

Then I made a startling discovery.

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posted by: NameFreak! View all posts by this author

By Kelli Brady of NameFreak!

I am currently catching up on the show Scandal, which takes place in the US Capital and involves the highest political figures of the land. The fictitious president has one of the best character names I’ve ever heard: Fitzgerald Thomas Grant. He is called Fitz by those close to him, and I can’t help but be drawn to it, especially since there are so many names that could lead to the nickname. Let’s take a look at the Fitzes!

Fitz is the Anglo-Norman version of -son and means “son of.” It eventually was used by the British family as a surname of the illegitimate children of kings and princes. Fitz is also a standalone surname of German origin.

There are a few Fitz names that are or have been used in the United States. In 2012, only Fitzgerald (12) and Fitzpatrick (7) were given to boys. Since 1880, the only other Fitz names given to 5 or more boys in any given year in the United States were Fitzhugh and Fitzroy. Fitz itself also has a history of use.

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