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Category: sibling names

babeann

by Linda Rosenkrantz

June has come to a close and with it the end of the year’s second quarter, meaning it’s time for our report on the names chosen for their Spring babies by Berries in April, May and June, as reported in the Forums.  As always, the baby names form a perfect microcosm of Nameberry style— from solid classics like Claire and Charles to vintage faves Cordelia and Cornelia to a range of highly original picks, including a girl named Happy.  There are also some great first-middle name combos and terrific twin and other sibsets.

This time around there were reports of seven sets of twins (as compared with last quarter’s ten):

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The Best Sibset You Know

vontrapp

It’s one of our longest-running forums, at 200+ pages and counting: Name a sibset you know.

On the forums it’s a game where one person names a sibset they know and the next person takes one of the names from that sibset and uses it in a different sibset they know.  Go ahead and play it, it’s fun.

So for this question of the week, we’re going to spin the challenge a bit differently and ask, What’s the best sibset — as in group of sibling names — you know?

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Twin Names: 8 Fresh Ways to Link

luke-catherine

It’s always so disappointing to see the most popular twin names in the U.S.   The majority are connected in such obvious ways, or in several obvious ways at the same time.  They’ve got the same first initial, they rhyme or at least have a similar rhythm, they share a derivation and/or a meaning, they’re identical in style and/or popularity and/or image – and often they’ve got all those factors going on at once.

Dominant pairs include Jada and Jayden, Taylor and Tyler, Ella and Emma, London and Paris.

But we think you can do better, much better, and we’re going to help you.  The point is to find twin names that share a strong bond yet remain distinct individuals, just as you would wish for your children.   Some ideas for fresh links between names are below — you might want to use these for finding compatible sibling pairs too!

Same first initial, different sound

Connecting twin names by using the same first initial may feel like the easiest and, let’s face it, most predictable and boring way to link.

But you can give the powerful initial connection a fresh twist by choosing names that share the initial but sound different.  Some first initials accommodate this idea better than others.  A few examples:

Cybele and Clio

Genevieve and Garrett

Imogen and Isla

Patrick and Philip

If you want to use a first initial that sounds the same no matter what, at least vary the second letter to give the overall sound of each name a distinct feel.  Examples:

David and Drew

Mabel and Murray

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The Names That Got Away

Toddler-Running

I wish I’d had a daughter named Margaret, called Daisy or Maisie or Mamie.  But it’s a name I grew to love only after I named my daughter, and then my next two children were boys.

Flora was the name we almost used for our daughter, but then chickened out.  And Eliza has long been my favorite girl’s name, but not one my husband likes.

Our only daughter would have been Henry if she’d been a boy, but then by the time we had a boy, I wanted to name him Joseph after my dad.  And by the time we had a second boy, there were too many Henrys in our neighborhood.

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quarter

Time again for one of my absolute favorite activities—rounding up the names that Berries have chosen over the past three-month period.  These are the winning picks after all the options were weighed– so often the result of enlightened discussions with and suggestions from fellowberries.

Today’s Quarterly Report includes an even more than usual range of fabulous choices, for both singletons and multiples–and we often get to see the sibsets these newbies fit into.

We also have some multiples of our own: three Spring babyberries each named Ivy and Miles, and two each called Charlotte, Cora, Eloise, Jasper, Leo, Oliver and Samuel.  Plus the similar but differently spelled Alice and Alys, Eleanor and Elinore, Mathilde and Matilda, Vivien and Vivienne, and Edmond and Edmund.

Some of the more intriguingly unusual choices: girls named Bennett , Connelly and Greyson, boys named Hawthorne and Jones, and distinctive middle names Sherlock, Capri, Dover, Huckleberry, and Adventure.

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