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Category: sibling baby names

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
Name Sage

Jackie writes:

We’re expecting baby #4 in early Februaryit’s a girl! – and are totally stuck on a name.

We already have three children: Eleanor Casey, called Ellie, and then twins, Tessa Lillian and Drew Morris, named for my great-grandparents, Lillian and Morris.

This time around my husband and I are having a hard time agreeing on anything!

Here are the names we’re considering, but not totally sold on:

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a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
Namesage

Amanda writes:

We are expecting our second child on February 16th, exactly two years after we welcomed our daughter, Evelina Viti. She goes by Lina. We chose not to find out the gender again this time, but it is making choosing a name that much harder!

Evelina’s middle name is from my husband’s family, which is very Italian. Our last name is Italian, too, and ends in ‘o’.

If Evelina had been a boy, we had chosen Byron Robert. Now that we have Evelina, we feel that Byron doesn’t work. It’s too English and short next to her very Italian, four-syllable name.

Most of the boy names I like are English or German, including Marius, Jasper, and Leander. My husband prefers something Italian, like Santino.

If this baby is a girl, we are equally stumped. I have suggested Lorelei, a nod to my German heritage. My husband is not totally opposed, but he doesn’t like that it means temptress. The middle name will be Magdalena, after my grandmother.

We both love traditional names that are somewhat unusual now. The meaning of the name is also important to us. We had a difficult pregnancy, so the fact that Evelina meant “wished for child” made it even more perfect.

So basically, I am afraid I won’t be able to find a name I love as much as my firstborn’s name!

The Name Sage replies:

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Sibling Names: The latest from London

British sibling names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

We love combing the birth announcements in the London Telegraph for baby name trends and ideas.

Each time we issue a report, we look for a different focus — unusual names, fascinating middle name combinations — and today it’s sibling names.

While we hate to exclude singletons with such wonderful names as Aurelia Liliana Rosabel and Tiago Rafferty Redfern, the sibling names were even juicier.

Some observations: The newest vintage names being unpacked from mothballs in England are Martha and Herbert.  Some of the most charming combinations mix ethnicities (Emiko and Freddie) or match first letters (Orlando and Ophelia).  Out-of-the-box middle names include word names, place-names, and surnames such as Spark, Houston, and Allgood.

Oh, and, as usual, these British parents manage to find baby names that are distinctive and adventurous and gorgeous without resorting to (almost ever) strange inventions or kree8tiv spellings.

Our picks from the latest announcements:

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nanyberryann

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Here it is, our report on the babyberries reported in the forums in the month of January and, as we’ve come to expect, there is the usual impressive array of classic and creative individual names, great first and middle combos, and cool sibsets.

Unlike December, when there were no multiples, this month we had not one but two sets of boy twins:

Arlo Sebastian & Ezra Valentine and

Arthur Florian Edward & Frederick Robin Jude

And speaking of Arthur, that was the only name used more than once, signaling the strong return of this once gallant Camelot name. ‘A’ was also the most popular first initial for boys, while for girls, M-beginnings took the lead.

I was interested to see one of the male virtue names, Loyal, used by a Berry as a middle, the imaginative Maple as a nickname for Marguerite, a big brother named Escher, and two separate paths to the nickname Cal. And of course, in the always intriguing comments made by these new parents.

Here they are:

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Twin Names: 8 Fresh Ways to Link

luke-catherine

It’s always so disappointing to see the most popular twin names in the U.S.   The majority are connected in such obvious ways, or in several obvious ways at the same time.  They’ve got the same first initial, they rhyme or at least have a similar rhythm, they share a derivation and/or a meaning, they’re identical in style and/or popularity and/or image – and often they’ve got all those factors going on at once.

Dominant pairs include Jada and Jayden, Taylor and Tyler, Ella and Emma, London and Paris.

But we think you can do better, much better, and we’re going to help you.  The point is to find twin names that share a strong bond yet remain distinct individuals, just as you would wish for your children.   Some ideas for fresh links between names are below — you might want to use these for finding compatible sibling pairs too!

Same first initial, different sound

Connecting twin names by using the same first initial may feel like the easiest and, let’s face it, most predictable and boring way to link.

But you can give the powerful initial connection a fresh twist by choosing names that share the initial but sound different.  Some first initials accommodate this idea better than others.  A few examples:

Cybele and Clio

Genevieve and Garrett

Imogen and Isla

Patrick and Philip

If you want to use a first initial that sounds the same no matter what, at least vary the second letter to give the overall sound of each name a distinct feel.  Examples:

David and Drew

Mabel and Murray

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