Category: nicknames for girls

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
Girlish name, boyish nickname

Shae writes:

My wife and I are expecting our first daughter in early July and cannot lock in a name.

I love distinctively classic feminine names that have a touch of alternative, like Florence, Clementine, and Estelle.

My wife likes more “tomboy” names like Pippa, Hudson, and Quinn. None of these even come close to something I would choose.

Based on this we are trying to find names that fit my criteria with an appropriate nickname that my wife loves. We have come up with Harriet/Hattie and Madeline/Maddie. But neither name feels right.

We do both absolutely love Clementine, but the nickname is always a bit of troublesome here.

Her middle name will be Ila -it’s a family name. Our surname is short, simple, starts with an M, and lends itself easily to almost every name.

If it were up to me, I would choose Florence Ila. I love the romance, but it’s a bit too much for my wife.

Names we love but have crossed off are Lola (clashes with Ila) and Esme (too repetitive with our surname).

The Name Sage responds:

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Great Lost Nicknames for Girls, Part 2

lost girls' nicknames

By Linda Rosenkrantz

We’re now at Part 3 (Part 2 for girls) in our hunt for lost nickname names worth reappraising and this time it’s girls’ names that have never ranked on the Top 1000 list. Consider them as fresh nicknames for classic faves, or for possible use on their own.

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Cute Comeback-Kid Nicknames for Girls

vintage nicknames for girls

By Linda Rosenkrantz

After a brief hiatus following the Sandy-Mandy-Cindy-Mindy years, nickname names are making a strong comeback. Just recently we’ve seen starbabies with names like Andy (for a girl), Art, Cy, Gus, Josh and Sid on their birth certificates. So with this in mind, we’re embarking here on a 4-part-long search for fresh vintage nickname ideas.

Today we consider girl nicknames that were used frequently enough at one time to make it into the Top 1000 list. Some dropped off because their mother names were no longer current (Effie/Euphemia), some just because they’d come to sound too grandmotherly, and others, like Freddie, that had become strictly male.

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name teasing

Pam Spam: That was a rare one, easy to ignore.

But Pammy, said in a whine-y, wheedle-y voice, was more hurtful.  To this day, if someone wants to get under my skin (I’m looking at you, Cousin Michael), they call me Pammy.

Were you ever teased about your name?  In what way?  How hurtful was it — did it verge on bullying, or was it more affectionate, even a sign of popularity?

And what about your children’s names?  Did you look for a name that was tease-proof, or at least one that would not lend itself to teasing?

Has your child gotten teased about his or her name?  Do you find people more tolerant and less prone to name-teasing today than they were when you were growing up?

Please tell us your experiences around names and teasing — either about your own name or the names of your children and loved ones.

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lovehatedolls

We got the idea for this Question of the Week from a forum thread titled, Loving Frederick, hating Fred, by a mom who wants to name her son Frederick but really, really, really does not want him to be called Fred or Freddie.

This is an issue that plagues many parents: Loving a name, but not its logical short form.  Or sometimes, it’s the other way around: An affection for Theo or Edie, say, but not so much for Theodore or Edith.

So our question of the week is: What name, is any, inspires this love-hate relationship in you?

Did you choose a name — or do you have a name — whose long form you love and short form you don’t or vice versa, and how do you handle it?  How does that work out for you?  Would you put the short form you love on the birth certificate and sidestep the long form you don’t entirely?

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