Names Searched Right Now:

Category: nature names

midd-belle

It’s been a while now since automatic go-to single-syllable middle names like Ann and Lee and Lynn and Beth were found on the majority of girls’ birth certificates, only to be followed by the suddenly and almost equally ubiquitous Rose and Grace. But now we’ve entered a new era of greater diversity—with forgotten favorites and fresh new, more individualistic, choices abounding. Here are some of the coolest, including a few drawn from nature.

Read More

posted by: bluejuniper View all posts by this author
naturebrooke

By Brooke Cussans, Baby Name Pondering

People often talk about choosing a name with “meaning,” and I feel that nature names have meaning for everyone. They can help to give us a spiritual connection to the world around us, a respect for the power and beauty that surrounds us.

I was watching a show recently about what would happen to the planet if humans just disappeared from Earth tomorrow. The thing that struck me the most was that even with the massive amounts of pollution humans have already generated, and even though the nuclear power plants would meltdown and throw tons of radiation into the atmosphere, given just decades the trees and oceans would clean the atmosphere and plant and animal life would continue. The power of nature is awe-inspiring sometimes.

Read More

posted by: bluejuniper View all posts by this author
quirknature

By Brooke Cussans, Baby Name Pondering

Animal and bird names seem a lot less strange as given names than they once did. But what if you want an animal inspired name that is a little less literal? Maybe something a little more traditional. Or maybe something a little more light hearted and whimsical. So here’s a look at a select group of daring names that reference animals and are full of quirky charm – all with the benefit of a cute, inbuilt animal nickname, but carrying less of an aggressive edge.

Bearnard

This variant of the Old French/German name Bernard has the bear reference but is still a legitimate name with history. It means ‘strong, brave bear’, which is hard to go past if you’re looking for names related to fierce animals. Bearnard has never charted in the U.S. but Bernard was a top 100 for many years and only dropped out of the top 1000 in recent years.

Read More

posted by: bluejuniper View all posts by this author
earthyname

By Brooke Cussans, Baby Name Pondering

A little while ago someone started a thread on the forums requesting “earthy” boys names. It got me to thinking about not just what names I would include on such a list, but why. What does the description “earthy” mean to you? Is it a concept, or do you see it literally? Here are three different ways I often view “earthy” names.

Salt of the Earth

People who are described as “salt of the earth” are thought to be loyal, trustworthy, honest and earnest. These are what we often think of as “good ol’ boys”. There’s nothing pompous, pretentious or fanciful about these names, which is possibly why so many of them are nicknames. They’re familiar, friendly and best of all very easy to wear.

Read More

Nook of Names Berry Juice profile image

Twelfth Night Names: From Airi to Wren

posted by: Nook of Names View all posts by this author
twelve-days-of-christmas_ornament

By K. M. Sheard, Nook of Names

Today is the Christian feast of Epiphany, the traditional date among Catholics and Protestants when the legendary “Three Kings” visited the baby Jesus.

In parts of Italy, it is at Epiphany, not on Christmas Day, that children get their presents — delivered by a witch called Befana by broomstick last night.

In Britain and America, however, Epiphany — which also happens to be the twelfth day of Christmas, that is to say “Twelfth Night” — is often entirely neglected now, though once, when the twelve days were kept with full festivity, it was a big event — so big, it even got a Shakespearian play named after it.

The fabled “Twelve Days of Christmas” have their roots in the Norse Jól, and were originally kept between December 20th and the 31st.

They also have very prosaic origins; at this darkest time of the year, with the harvest gathered in, animals slaughtered, and crops requiring sowing in the autumn sowed, there really wasn’t much that needed doing – making it a perfect time for relaxing, and enjoying the year’s produce while it was still fresh.

Read More