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Twin Names with Inspired Links

posted by: karacavazos View all posts by this author
Twins not matchy-matchy

By Kara Cavazos @ The Art of Naming

Here in the US, some of the most popular twin sets include names like Matthew & Michael, Daniel & David, Hailey & Hannah or Ella & Emma. Yet others are even matchier such as Lillian and Jillian, Bryan & Ryan or Jesse & Jessica. While there isn’t technically anything wrong with matching names together like this, there are plenty of ways to be more creative when naming twin while still allowing them to have their own identities.

I’ve come up with three ways to help parents make sure their twins won’t have overly matchy names. We will examine twin names that are linked together by meaning while still being different from one another, names that sound very different but still work together stylistically, and names that share a common sound without rhyming or being too sound-alike.

1. Linked by meaning

These names don’t rhyme or sound alike but they do share a similar meaning. This is great for parents who feel the urge to make twin names matchy but don’t want to rhyme or have the names start with the same letter.

Female Twins: 

Aurora & Roxanne (“Dawn“)
Eve & Zoey (“To Live” / Life”)
Corinna & Imogen (“Maiden”)

Male Twins:
Joshua & Isaiah (“God is Salvation”)
Derek & Henry (“Ruler of People / Home Rule“)
Matthew & Theodore (“Gift of God”)

Male/Female Twins:
David & Cara (“Beloved“)
Beau & Calista (“Beautiful”)
Brendan & Sarah (“Prince / Princess“)

Or the rare instance where the meaning of a name is also a name:

Margaret & Pearl (“Pearl“)
Susannah & Lily (“Lily“)
Daphne & Laurel (“Laurel“)
Hannah & Grace (“Grace“)
Ione & Violet (“Violet“)
Erica & Heather (“Heather“)

2. Very different sounds

These names may be of a similar style or origin but they do not sound the same. They do not rhyme; they might not even have any of the same letters in common. These names stand together but have their own identities.

Female Twins:

Charlotte & Matilda
Emma & Chloe
Molly & Jessica
Daisy & Lola
Jade & Tabitha

Male Twins:
Tyler & Brandon
Hunter & Mason
Kevin & Patrick
Oliver & Flynn
Jacob & Gideon

Male/Female Twins:
Cole & Brianna
Gavin & Alexandra
Jeremy & Nicole
Evan & Isabella
Benjamin & Emily

3. Complementary sounds

These names share a similar sound or two, but they are not overwhelmingly similar and they do not rhyme. Often, these sounds will be emphasized differently and the names will have different syllable counts.

Female Twins:

Brooke & Rebecca  (B & R)
Natalie & Lauren (N & L)
Ivy & Genevieve (V)

Male Twins:
Milo & Dominic (M)
Vincent & Oliver (V)
Lewis & Maxwell (W & L)

Male/Female Twins:
James & Tessa (S)
Phillip & Seraphina (Ph)
Brooks & Aubrey (Br)

What do you think of this list?  Whether you like or dislike the idea of making twin names overly matchy, perhaps you can share in the comments some examples of names that you appreciate on twins.  Do you have twins of your own? Do you have twin names picked out just in case? Where do you draw the line between the names being subtly linked and being too close for comfort?

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By Hannah Young

I am name obsessed. When I am reading at bedtime to my eight-year old son, I will pause as we encounter new characters, “Hmm … Polly, that’s a good name isn’t it?” before he puts his fingers in his ears and begs for mercy, “Stop the naming madness, Mummy!”

I scan the credits of every TV show, hoping for divine inspiration.

My own mother taunts me; “You have been making lists of names since you could write and you can’t even chose a name for your own daughter. But I don’t like Ruby, dogs are called Ruby, the stupidest person I know has a granddaughter called Ruby, I don’t want a granddaughter called Ruby.”

I am due with non-identical twin girls in about four weeks time. My partner and I agreed we’d name a baby each. He has chosen his name – Leonora Mary.

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posted by: irishmom View all posts by this author

By Tara Wood

My husband and I have six kids. If naming babies were an Olympic sport, I’m pretty sure I’d medal. Not necessarily in quality or creativity but in experience.

When we had our first daughter in 2001, choosing her name literally took 5 minutes. My husband suggested Juliet. I loved it immediately but suggested the longer French version, Juliette, because I thought it made a better balance with our short, somewhat masculine-feeling last name. He agreed.

Her middle name was chosen before I was ever even knocked up.  In 1998, I was visiting Ireland when a bomb blast in the Northern Ireland city of Omagh claimed the lives of 29 people.  One of those souls was that of a little girl named Maura. I made a silent and personal vow to use that name if I were ever to have a baby girl.  Also, Maura is the Irish form of Mary and we are Catholic, so it was especially precious to me. We never looked back or second guessed our choice of Juliette Maura.

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Twin Names: Your perfect pair?


Today’s Question of the Week concerns twin names

If you were having twins tomorrow—well, maybe not tomorrow, exactly—what would you name:

  • A girl-girl set
  • A boy-boy set
  • A girl-boy set?


Would you go the old-style twin names route and give them matching initials or names that rhyme?

Would you seek a similar feel and style?

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twin names

Guest blogger Laura Blackwell offers some practical advice for naming multiples–based on her own experience.

When you find out you’re having twins, your baby-naming duties get more than doubly complicated. The moment my husband and I saw that second jellybean on the ultrasound, some of our plans went out the window. Since then, we’ve learned about many challenges and much confusion over twin names–some before naming our daughters, and some after.

Nameberry has already touched on several of the pitfalls of naming multiples: the matchy-matchy names, the rhymes, the names so different that anyone they meet will think one kid got the “good” name. The following are some more of the surprises that parents of multiples encounter.

Equal weight: If you’re into the meanings of names, finding comparable names for your kids can be challenging. In childhood, my friend Craig was taunted by his sister Cynthia. “I’m named after a goddess,” she told him, “and you’re named after a rock.” They’re not even twins. Thinking about that made us decide against giving one of our twins a mythological name and the other the name of a flower.

Initial difficulties: Cute as it may seem to name your kids with the same first letter, it can cause problems. I have heard twin moms say that their insurance tried to deny claims as double-billing, based on the first initial and birth date. And if originality is important to you, limiting yourself to one letter may backfire. I know three different moms who named their twin daughters Hayley and Hannah (with spelling variations).

“Which one is the boy?”: Boy/girl twins are the most common type of multiples. Many well-meaning people will simply assume that one of your kids is male and the other female. Gender-ambiguous names, such as last-names-as-first-names, add to the confusion. If you’re naming your boys Cooper and Edison, brace yourself for compliments about your “daughter’s” long eyelashes. Which one they call the daughter will vary.

They can’t even tell the names apart: Have you ever heard a restaurant hostess call “Denise,” only to have a peeved-looking Dennis stand up? Not everybody is good at phonetic spelling. To many of the people your kids will encounter in life, Casey and Cassie look like the same name. Your children will almost certainly share a birthdate, and if they’re same-sex, they may look a lot alike…it’s better if at least their names are different.

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