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Category: names from pop culture

Newest Word Names for Girls

word names for girls

By Abby Sandel

Back in 2007, Thirty Rock’s Cerie told Liz Lemon that she already had baby names picked out. “If it’s a girl, Bookcase, or Sandstorm, or maybe Hat, but that’s more of a boy’s name.”

While Hat and Bookcase remain – thankfully – unused, parents continue to embrace the idea of word names – nouns, adjectives, and even a few verbs – for our children’s names.

This week’s celebrity birth announcements highlight the range of possibilities.

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silent actress names

By Bree Ogle 

In the first third of the 20th century, movies began to take hold in America and Europe. Although theatre was still prominent (and movie actors and actresses were considered ‘lowly’ by theatre people), the birth of the “star” only truly came about when motion pictures became popular. Today I’m looking at the female stars of those silent screen days.

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1980s baby names

By Abby Sandel

What defines the 1980s?

There’s breakdancing and the Rubik’s Cube, legwarmers and Pac-Man, Prince William instead of Prince George. But how about the names?

Thirty years ago, the most popular baby names for boys included Jason and Joshua, Michael and Christopher, Andrew and Ryan – the dad names of 2015.

But rewind that VCR in your head to the names of movie characters, popular singers and actors, and more. A surprising number of those names have become among the most stylish choices for boys born today.

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Quirky UK TV Actress Names

British TV names

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Ever since I spotted the name Honeysuckle on the credits of the ITV series Foyle’s War, I have been riveted by the cast rolls at the end of other British shows. For if the characters on these comedies and dramas have good names, some of the actors—particularly the women—have fantastic ones, and to me at least, they seem quintessentially British. Here are some of the best I’ve spotted.

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nursery rhyme names

With their lilting rhythms and catchy rhymes, nursery rhymes have delighted successive generations of children since the first publication of Mother Goose in the 1700s—though the original meanings, some of them political, have been lost. (Who knew that ‘Ring Around a Rosy’ referred to the Great Plague of 1665?) The names used very much reflected the small stockpot of those in current use —so a preponderance of Marys, Sallys, Bettys, Jacks, Georgies, Peters, Toms and Tommys, Billys and Willies–but there were a few more original names, and here are a dozen of the best.

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