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Category: names for brothers

A Creative Approach to Sibling Names

sibss

British baby names seem especially fascinating to our American sensibilities, familiar and exotic at the same time. Once every handful of months, I allow myself a visit to the Birth Announcements in the London Telegraph, the way one might ration such indulgences as a banana split or a day in bed with a good book. And each time I report back to the devoted berries, I try to take a different view of the Telegraph’s baby name offerings.

This time, the focus is sibsets: Groups of distinctly British and delightfully quirky names. While I hate to leave such delicious choices as Constanza Una Honoria or Reuben Clarence William behind — and look there!, I didn’t have to! — there’s something new to be gained by seeing these choices with their brother and sister names.

British baby names and sibsets from the most recent Telegraph viewing:

girls

AGATHA ROSE, a sister for Scarlett and Tilly

ARAMINTA (MINTY) ISOBEL ROSE, sister for Mungo

BRIDIE ANNE, sister for Joseph

CELESTE JOHANNA, sister for Carter

COCO HEATHER KATE, sister for Willem and Xen

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Sibling Names: Does Flow Matter?

hispanic-siblings

A lot of the discussions about sibling names on the nameberry message boards come down to one question: Does flow matter?

To some parents, flow seems to be the most important quality, and any names of little brothers and sisters have to “flow” — be perfectly compatible in sound and feel — from the names that came before.

Some passionate berries, as nameberry aficionados have come to be called, talk about sibsets: groups of sibling names high on flow.

To others, flow and sibsets matter less….or not at all.

What’s YOUR feeling about sibling names? How much does flow matter? Did you think about sibsets when choosing names?

And what, in your opinion, are some of the best and worst sibling names you’ve ever heard? Tell all!

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siblings

One of our favorite baby name blogs is Nancy‘s Baby Names, written by Nancy C. Man, which is where we found this wonderful piece on baby name patterns and sibling names.

Humans love patterns. Just look last year’s list of popular twin names:

Jacob & Joshua
Daniel & David
Jayden & Jordan
Ethan & Evan
Taylor & Tyler
Gabriella & Isabella
Isaac & Isaiah
Madison & Morgan
Elijah & Isaiah
Ella & Emma

Eight pairs start with the same letter. Seven have the same rhythm. Another seven end with the same letter (and many of these nearly rhyme).

For twins and other multiples, name patterns are easy. You know the number of children and their genders ahead of time. But what if you want a name pattern for an entire sibling set? That can make things tricky. You don’t know how many children you’ll have, or what their genders will be. You also don’t know how your tastes may change over time.

If you’re thinking about a name pattern to cover all of your kids, here are three pieces of advice to consider before you begin:

Don’t lock yourself into something limiting.
Let’s say you like flowers. You have a daughter and you name her Lily. You have another daughter and name her Rose. Then another, Jasmine. And then a fourth, but…you don’t like any other flower names. Iris? Too old. Poppy? Too young. Zinnia? Too weird. Amaryllis will never be spelled correctly. And Daisy is the golden retriever down the street.

Or, let’s say you have a son named Alexander. Then you have another boy, and you decide to name him Xavier so they both have that X in common. Then baby #3–a little girl–comes along. Well, you can’t do Alexis–that’s too close to Alexander. You won’t go near Maxine because you fear maxi pad jokes. Roxanne reminds you too much of that song. Xena reminds you too much of that show. And Beatrix makes you think of rabbits.

When you play chess, you have to think ahead several moves. Look at sibling name patterns the same way. Think ahead as many kids as possible. If you can think of 10 or more usable names that fit the pattern, it’s probably a safe pattern. If you can’t, the pattern may be too limiting to be sustainable.

Consider the pros and cons of visibility.
Have you heard of the Duggars? They have nearly 20 kids, and all of those kids have a J-name. This type of name pattern is one of the easiest to spot. (Especially in large families.)

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