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Category: Baby Names Popularity

vintage baby names

Most of  the vintage names that have gained in popularity this year have obvious charms—Tobias, say, and Clementine, sweet Adeline and Matilda and spunky Mabel— names that might elicit coos from admiring older relatives. But there are others on the rise that feel more midcentury than antique, and which could completely bewilder your mother-in-law or Gran, who still associate them with their own in-laws or Grans.

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posted by: Nick View all posts by this author
Christmas baby names

By Nick Turner

It’s the holiday season, which means eggnog, carols, twinkling lights and — for millions of American parents — remembering to move that damn elf around the house every night.

Yes, I’m talking about Elf on the Shelf, the Christmas tradition that feels like it’s been going on forever but is less than ten years old. If you’re unacquainted, the idea is to plant an elf doll in your home that serves as a sentry for Santa. It watches your children and reports on their evil deeds. (Somehow this delights kids rather than terrifying them.)

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decade 1910

By Linda Rosenkrantz

The folks at the Social Security Administration publish not only the thousand most popular names for every year dating back to 1880, but also the Top 200 names for every decade, making it possible to see broader patterns and trends.

I was scanning these decade lists to see if I might find any goodies that have escaped the mass raid on vintage names, and was able to pick out two girls and two boys from every decade from the 1880s to the 1950s that were once in the Top 100 but are not even in the Top 1000 now.

I ‘ve included the year they fell off the list and their highest ever point of popularity—plus some possible pros and cons. (Of course most of these names spilled over from one decade to the next.)

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Abby Berry Juice profile image

Top Names of 2033: Boys edition

posted by: Abby View all posts by this author
2033

By Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Here’s the thing about baby name data: the Top 20 is actually kind of dull.

Not the names themselves, necessarily.  In order to become one of the 20 most popular given names in the US for any particular year, a name has to be pretty great.  Versatile.  They’ve usually been worn by some high profile types, be they Biblical patriarchs or borrowings from the silver screen.

But we can see them coming.

By the time a name reaches such lofty heights, we’ve watched it gain for ten, twenty, forty years or more, right?  Former #1 Isabella climbed every year from 1990 through 2009 before reaching the top spot.  Even newcomers like Jayden don’t debut in the Top 100.  Others – think William, James, Elizabeth – are frequent members of the club, as likely to be there in the 1880s or 1940s as they are today.

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U.S.A. Map by Johnny Yanok (johnnyyanok.com)

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Now that Social Security has released the top names for every state, we can move beyond the broad nationwide picture and delve into the more regional patterns.  As you’ll see below, far from every state was on board with newly crowned Noah—in fact he topped the lists of only three states. Also it’s interesting to see how various favorites spill over shared borders, such as which names were common primarily in New England (Benjamin!), the South (Brooklyn!) and the West (Harper!), as well as such idiosyncrasies as Paisley being a Top 5 name in Wyoming, Lincoln in the Utah Top 10 and Aria a top name in Hawaii.

TOP 5 GIRLS

Though Sophia, Emma, Olivia, Isabella and Ava were the Top 5 nationwide, Sophia was at the top of the list in only 11 states, while Emma ruled in 27, Olivia in seven, Ava in three and Isabella in two.  The one outlier? Charlotte was in the lead in the District of Columbia.

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