Category: most popular baby names

Most Popular Girls’ Names 2015

popular baby girl names 2015

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Charlotte, the name of Britain’s baby princess and the newest entrant to the US Top 10, reigns as the new Number 1 girls’ name on Nameberry’s 2015 popularity list.

Charlotte takes over from Imogen as the most-viewed girls’ name on Nameberry, reclaiming the crown she held on our site from 2009 through 2011.

Amelia, the official Number 1 girls’ name in England and Wales, stands at Number 2, and Ava moves all the way up from Number 26 to claim the third-place spot.

Olivia, Lucy, and Evelyn are new to Nameberry’s Top 10 for girls, taking over for Khaleesi, Violet, and Hazel.

Girls’ names new to Nameberry’s Top 100 are: Astrid, Avery, Eden, Eliana, Elise, Elsie, Emery, Emilia, Eva, Evie, Hadley, Julia, Leah, Nova, Quinn, Riley, Rowan, Sienna, and Thea.

The Top 10 furthest rising baby names for girls, with the number of places they’ve jumped in 2015 over 2014, are:

  1. Esme, +55
  2. Evelyn, +51
  3. Mia, +35
  4. Abigail, +32
  5. Luna, +30
  6. Chloe, +27
  7. Emily, +26
  8. Arabella, +24
  9. Ava, +23
  10. Anna, +22

The Nameberry popularity list gauges interest levels of visitors in names, measuring which of our name pages received the most of our over 300 million pageviews. The majority of people searching on the site are looking for names for their babies, so our popularity list measures which names parents are likely to be naming their children in 2015 and 2016, versus the official US popularity list, which looks at which names parents chose in 2014. Nameberry’s searches also register ups and downs in interest due to news – such as Princess Charlotte’s birth – or pop culture events.

In 2015, three names popularized by movies and television shows — Daenerys, Elsa, and Katniss — fell off the Top 100, while Khaleesi was one of furthest-falling.  Also vanishing from our popularity list are several girls’ names with the trendy double-l sound: Delilah, Lily, and Lola, though Lila remains strong at Number 24.

Our full Top 100 baby names for girls in 2015 is:

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18 Hottest New Baby Names

new baby names

by Abby Sandel

Back in 1944, names like Judy, Beverly, and Bruce felt new. In the 1970s, Kelly, Justin, and Shawn were novel. And in 1994, we were busy naming our sons original choices like Austin and Tyler, while our daughters became Alexis and Taylor.

Parents are always dreaming up new baby names, taking our inspiration from pop culture and the past. Not every new name feels freshly minted. Some seem like throwbacks, even vintage gems. Others become mainstream so quickly that it’s hard to imagine the names haven’t always been in use.

But make no mistake: plenty of the most popular baby names in the US are recent arrivals, as new the newborns who wear them.

How to define a truly new baby name? There are eight boy names and ten girl names that have only ranked in the US Top 100 for the past five years. They’ve also (almost) never charted in the US Top 1000 prior to 1984 – thirty years ago.

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Most Popular Baby Names, A to Z

popular baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

We were so entranced with the blog Eleanor Nickerson–aka Elea– did for us on most popular British baby names by letter that we decided to recreate it using the American popularity list.

Our research intern Megan Garon pored over the US statistics to compile the following list of the top girls’ and top boys’ name for every letter from A to Z.   Well, not every letter as it turns out there is no girls’ name starting with U in the Top 1000!

Other interesting facts that emerge when looking at the US popularity list through the alphabetical lens:

— Some letters (E, for instance) include names that are a lot closer to the top of the list than others (F, to cite a nearby example).  This is hardly earth-shattering news and yet, the differences are notable.

— While there are plenty of traditional names heading their letter’s popularity rank, a remarkable number of the top names are new ones.  Take H, for example, where Harper and Hunter trump classics Helen and Henry, or P, where Peyton and Parker dominate rather than Patricia and Paul.

— In a few cases, the top names for a letter for girls and boys are remarkable similar — Riley and Ryan, for instance, and Willow and William, and especially Quinn and Quinn!  This is evidence of the trend toward boys’ and girls’ names taking their sound and style cues from each other.

— When you look at most popular names this way, a few really unusual choices come to the fore by leading their little pack.  We’re looking at you, Ximena, Yaretzi, and Yahir.

Here, the most popular names for every letter in 2013 in the US, with overall standings for the names in parentheses.

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posted by: NameFreak! View all posts by this author
#1 baby name

By Kelli Brady, NameFreak!

Most of us know that the top names on the Social Security list aren’t given to as many babies as they once were.  Here, data whiz Kelli shows how the Number 1 names have become less and less popular through the years, tracing the percentages of babies given the top name from 1880 to now.

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posted by: NameFreak! View all posts by this author
baby names

By Kelli Brady, The Name Freak!

For a second year, I present the “real” Top 50 by combining the different spellings of each name. Because when you hear “Jacob!” on the playground, you have no idea how his name is spelled, but you know you hear the name a lot. Where does it really rank compared to other names?

Note: These are the combined spellings of the names in the Top 1000 only. The main name listed is the spelling given to the most babies in 2013 (SSA Rank is in parentheses). The others are in alphabetical order. Opinions vary on how different spellings are pronounced. I went with my best judgment.

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