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Category: Linda Rosenkrantz

literary lads

By Linda Rosenkrantz

We recently served up a dozen female literary names—some of the more unusual and interesting appellations for girls that have never gained widespread popularity the way Jane Austen’s Emma and GWTW’s Scarlett O’Hara have.

We promised to do the same for boys, and here they are—the creatively conceived names of twelve literary lad characters from a variety of novels and plays–names that move beyond the recently discovered Atticus and Holden.

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October births

By Linda Rosenkrantz

I don’t know about you, but I get a tremendous kick every month seeing what names—after all the discussion and debate—Berries finally have chosen for their babes. There is always such a wonderful mix of surprising choices, unique combinations, new patterns emerging.

October brought three sets of twins—one each of the girl/girl, boy/boy and girl/boy varieties:

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Instrumental Musical Names

musical baby names

We’ve written and talked about musical words like Aria, about jazz, rock and country singers, classical musicians, and opera and operetta and Broadway musical name, but we’ve never looked at the music instruments themselves. We’ve found some are as common as Viola, others as rare and exotic as Chiaramella.

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12 literary girls

By Linda Rosenkrantz

Novels and plays are filled with wonderful character names that provide great naming inspiration–recently we’ve seen that reflected in the newfound popularity of Holden from Catcher in the RyeAtticus and Scout from To Kill a Mockingbird, Scarlett from Gone with the Wind.

Today we’re looking at some of the more unique girls’ names that haven’t gained that kind of popularity–some of them perhaps not likely to. It was hard to make a choice, but here are a dozen that made the cut.  We’ll be doing the same thing for boys soon.

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halloween baby names

Horrors! It’s almost Halloween, which, in addition to everything else, gives us the opportunity to consider some scary names. This year, instead of looking at the usual monstrous character suspects—the ghosts and witches and evil spirits—we’re going to consider the real-life people who created and embodied the monsters, both on paper and on screen. And of course, it’s their distinctive names that get them in our own squeaky door.

Ambrose

Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce was a respected and versatile 19th century author, critic and journalist who wrote dozens of ghost and horror stories, gathered together in an anthology called Can Such Things Be? The all-but-forgotten name Ambrose has a pleasant rosy, ambrosial feel. Popular in Bierce’s time, it’s still well liked on Nameberry, ranking at Number 267.

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