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Category: Linda Rosenkrantz

spring5

By Linda Rosenkrantz

In most places, Spring—to use an overused phrase—has sprung.  The snows of winter have finally melted, buds are budding, birds are chirping.  Which means it’s time to offer a seasonal menu of names—this time a multi-cultural mix whose meanings connote spring, plus names of ancient goddesses, and a few flowers and birthstones.

Amaryllis, the lovely spring-blooming bulb, is one of the more extreme flower names now beginning to be cultivated; others include Hyacinth and Daffodil.

Aviv and Aviva are male and female versions of a Hebrew name meaning ‘springtime’; another variation is Avivi, which means ‘springlike’ and is also the word for lilac.  (Tel Aviv , btw, means ‘hill of spring’.)  Aviva has long been popular in Israel and its two vibrant v’s could work well here as another path to vibrant nickname Vivi.

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Irish baby names

Kick up your heels, get out your shillelagh and prepare to dance a jig as we celebrate St. Paddy’s Day with twelve musical Irish names—some of which were introduced to us by musicians who, as a bonus, taught us the right way to pronounce them.

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suff11

For Women’s History Month, we honor some of the army of activist heroes who have fought the struggle for women’s rights over the years. Rather than focusing on the more familiar names, from Susan B. Anthony to Gloria Steinem, we look to some lesser-known (with a couple of exceptions) American and British champions of gender equality. And of course, Nameberry being Nameberry, we’ve picked the ones with the most distinctive names.

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febbabyberry

By Linda Rosenkrantz

February may be a short month, with somewhat fewer names than usual, but we’ve still had a full complement of beautifully-named Babyberries reported on the Birth Announcement forum.

We’re always particularly on the lookout for twins, and this month there were two sets, one boy-girl and one boy-boy:

Vera Maeve and Fletcher Joseph

Arthur Noel and Louis Edward.

 It was a month that brought girls named Brynn and Wynne, a Margo and a Marguerite, the return of Enid and Ezeriah, and in middle place Mahogany, Job and Jerome. ‘E’ was the most prominent vowel starter and ‘M’ the standout consonant.

Here are the names, with their sibs, and some explanatory comments.

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placeverona

There’s no shortage of place names on the baby-name map. In the Top 300 alone, we find Sienna and Sierra, Camden and Trenton, London and Paris, not to mention Brooklyn, Austin, Sydney, Kingston, Hudson and Georgia. But what if you’re looking for a less traveled destination? Here are some fresher possibilities.

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