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Category: inventive baby names

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We’ve looked across history and geography at the men and women whose inventions have affected our lives—in both major ways (the electric light bulb, the elevator)  and minor (the coffee filter, the crossword puzzle)—and picked those with the best baby-name potential.

And here are our top Nameberry picks of historic baby names based on those of important inventors:

Alessandro Volta–Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Gerolamo Umberto Volta was an Italian physicist who invented the battery in the nineteenth century.

Amalie Auguste Melitta Bentz –As you might have guessed from her second middle name, A.A. Melitta  Bentz invented the coffee filter.

Arthur Wynne—Liverpool-born journalist Arthur Wynne created the first crossword puzzle.  Originally called word-cross, it debuted in the New York World newspaper in 1913.

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In this week’s Nameberry 9, Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain demonstrates the endless ingenuity there is out there in coming up with creative baby names.

This week’s baby name news was dominated by tales of a mom who has agreed to let the general public name her baby in exchange for $5,000.  It turned out to be a hoax, but it raises the question:  Would you ever let another person name your child?

It’s an unthinkable transaction for most of us.  We have extensive lists of baby names carefully assembled and edited over the years.  I like to think that I could blissfully name eight more children, each with two middles.

Or could I?

Creative freedom in baby naming is here to stay.  Even parents who say they prefer the mainstream often choose names like Chloe and Noah, Avery and Jayden, possibilities that would have been quite surprising a few decades back.

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This week, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel draws nine inventive names from the ever-widening and deepening pool of baby names.

Did our great-grandparents struggle to choose baby names?

Berries know that inventive baby naming has a surprisingly long history. Earlier generations may have had access to fewer resources – no baby name books, no internet, no nameberry.com – but our family trees are proof that parents still managed to come up with more creative baby names than just Mary and John.

As I look at baby name news every week, it is often overwhelming. Fictional characters, famous figures, obscure names featured on websites, newsworthy places and words that would just plain make great names – there are acres of great ideas, with new ones every week. Coupled with a greater awareness of the most popular names, no wonder we hear so many parents wondering if Sophia is too common, Seraphina too Hollywood, Sariah too hard to spell.

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