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invented baby names

By Pamela Redmond Satran

Last week we challenged you to invent a great baby name. You took us up on it….and how! Over 200 entries later, Linda and I along with Nameberry’s senior editor and writer Abby Sandel made our individual lists of favorites.

There were only a handful of names on all three of our lists – and our two winners were chosen from those names that won unanimous approval. But before we get to those, let’s look at the long list of names we liked and the categories that sparked the best inventions.

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Invent a Name Contest!

invented baby names

People invent new names all the time, so why not you?

Surely you can do better than Hatice or Loganne, Zake or Zyree, all genuine invented names found on the 2013 U.S. official baby name list.

To motivate you further, we are offering a complete library of our ebooks to the inventor of the name we deem the best.  And by best we mean the most attractive, most theoretically usable, most inspired, and one we like the most.

Your invented name can be a combination of two (or more) existing names, a word turned into a name, or a confection spun from the ether.

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posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
invented glinda

By Angela Mastrodonato, Upswing Baby Names

With names, as with other subjects, once I learned my assumptions were wrong, I was put in my place.

Pre-kids, I was a name-snob who openly expressed disdain for invented names, grouping all invented names with experimental spellings, and modern word-play creations such as Abcde (ab-si-dee) and La-A (la-dash-ah).

And then shortly after my daughter was born, I discovered I had unintentionally given her an invented name.

No, I didn’t invent the name. The name was invented by an author, and they seem to have a knack for inventing great names. One author known as a master-namer is Shakespeare.

My daughter’s name, Fiona, was first used (and believed to have been invented) by Scottish poet James Macpherson in the 18th century.

Other established names invented by authors are Janice and Vanessa. Certain there must be more author-invented names, I set out to find them.

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hungergames 4

This week, Appellation Mountain’s Abby Sandel leads us through the world of The Hunger Games, introducing us to its population of fantastically named characters.

Even if you haven’t read the books, you’ve probably heard of The Hunger Games.  The trilogy has topped the bestseller lists, and buzz about the upcoming movie adaptation has been constant for the past few months.

It is the tale of a girl from the wrong side of the tracks who overthrows a cruel and despotic government. Katniss Everdeen becomes the unlikely heroine after she is chosen to fight to the death in a televised game controlled by the all-powerful Capitol.  It’s part Greek myth, part reality TV.

Author Suzanne Collins is quite the storyteller, and she’s a masterful namer of characters.  Katniss sounds like a smoosh of classics like Katherine and Frances, but the name is borrowed from an edible aquatic plant.  Sagittaria, the plant’s Latin name, comes from its arrow-shaped leaves.  And wouldn’t you know it?  Katniss saves the day through her extraordinary skill with a bow and arrow.

Even if you’re not into sci fi, the series is worth a read for the names alone.  In Collins’ post-apocalyptic future, some familiar choices have endured, while other names have been sourced from the past.  Many are new, drawn from the changed world in which her characters live.  Each of the outlying Districts has a certain specific style. 

This list includes minor characters and villains, and they range from the perfectly wearable to the truly out-there.

FELLOW CONTESTANTS & PAST CHAMPIONS

Brutus

Cato – A willing contestant, from wealthy District 2.  In the more affluent Districts, children often train for the Games, hoping for a chance to win riches and glory.

Cashmere

Cecilia

Clove

Gloss

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Unusual Baby Names: Real, rare and invented

abby4

Abby Sandel– creator of the wonderful AppellationMountain blog–trawls the web to investigate what unusual names have popped up this week, and found some doozies, from Vash to Pheriby.

 The Week in Review: February 8 – 14, 2011

Happy Valentine’s Day!  It’s tempting to write something about sugary sweet, lace-trimmed appellations for February 14, but Pam and Linda have already covered everything from Valentine to Jetadore.

Instead, thanks to a comment on my blog, I’m thinking about the ugly arguments about baby names of recent coinage.  The tension at Appellation Mountain erupted over a respelling of the rapidly-rising LoreleiLorelei seems like the new Mackenzie, subject to endless variations.  I spotted Laurelea earlier this week, and now a mom mentioned using Laurelie – “anyone have a problem with that?” 

Over at Baby Names Garden, Neil Street summed up H.L. Mencken’s 1919 comments on unusual baby names, just as common in the early 20th century as they are today.  From Hoke to Maybeth, it is a nice reminder that making up new names is, well, nothing new.

Last month, Laura Wattenberg wrote about the frustration parents feel when the name they’ve “invented” is suddenly popping up everywhere.  This week, she followed up with some thoughts on authors’ invented names, from Neil Gaiman’s typo that created Coraline to Anne Rice’s misunderstanding that led to Lestat.

Speaking of names invented by writers, Nancy tallied up the number of baby boys named after Rambo.  It’s more than you might imagine.

Since rumor has it that Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz have chosen Leo as their son’s name, we were treated to a few articles like this one at The Stir, declaring the end of outlandish celeb baby names. The article cited a bunch of recent starbaby birth announcements: Cynthia Nixon and Christine Marinoni’s Max Ellington and Olivia Jane, a daughter for Colin Hanks and Samantha Bryantl.

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