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Category: international baby names

posted by: Tiana Putric View all posts by this author
Spelling Bee Names

By Tiana Putric

Spellebrities are kids who can spell words that most of us simply can’t: appoggiatura, cymotrichous, esquamulose, guetapens, and stichomythia. According to cognitive science professor Brenda Rapp, talented spellers can do this because “it’s possible that they have something extra” or that areas of their brains are “especially well-tuned.”

Last week super-spellers from across the United States competed in America‘s 91st Scripps National Spelling Bee and totally wowed television viewers and social media followers. The purse – $40,000 cash, a $2,500 U.S. savings bond, and lots of other goodies. Meet master spellers Jairam and Nihar, this year’s co-champions, and browse the names of past winners -some old, some new, many international – and see their winning words along with the definitions.

Perhaps baby’s first book should be a dictionary?

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posted by: waltzingmorethanmatilda View all posts by this author
Australian baby names climbing

By Anna Otto, WaltzingMoreThanMatilda

The Australian Top 100 just came out, not long after the US data. One small difference is that we count variant spellings as the same name, although only a few names with more than one dominant spelling actually make the Top 100. It’s interesting to see what makes a name rise in popularity, and the international trends at work.

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swiss5

By Rene Brunner, of babynames.ch

Switzerland is quite a small country: it has roughly the area of the state of Maryland, but a larger population (eight millions versus six); Virginia has about the same number of people, but is double the size.

A key element in Swiss nomenclature is its linguistic split. Nearly three-fourths of Swiss citizens have a dialect of German as their native language; a little less than one-fourth speak French, and the remaining few percentages have Italian as their mother tongue.

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blue surprise

We’re always adding new baby names to our database, and the latest collection all have international roots.  These additions were partially inspired by the update of our baby name popularity page to include Top 100 lists from several countries beyond the U.S.  We also thank Nameberry readers who contributed names from their home countries that were new to us.   Here, the dozen (plus) newest international baby names on Nameberry.

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Jewish Baby Names: Happy Passover!

passover

By Nephele

As Passover approaches, a look at some of the names found in Jewish culture.

Yiddish names have a rich history, rooted in an older generation of Jewish people belonging to the Ashkenazic (from Germany and Eastern Europe) community. The Yiddish language evolved during medieval times from High German (influenced by Hebrew and some eastern European languages), and the word “Yiddish” itself literally means “Jewish.” Genealogists familiar with old U.S. Federal Census records will have noticed many a census record where the census taker recorded an immigrant’s language as being “Jewish” when it more properly should have been recorded as “Yiddish.”

While many fondly associate Yiddish names with their beloved grandparents and great-grandparents, Yiddish is nonetheless making a comeback. California‘s San Francisco Bay area is home to Der Bay, a widely circulated Anglo-Yiddish newsletter of events, and such movies as Fiddler on the Roof and the animated An American Tail (both featuring Yiddish-named characters) are fondly familiar to mainstream America.

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