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Category: international baby names

Unique Baby Names: Do you dare?

alice and cat

by Pamela Redmond Satran

Reading the latest birth announcement from England‘s Telegraph newspaper, I can’t help thinking that a lot of the names, while wonderful, might give many sensible parents pause.

Wilfred may be cool, after all, but it’s also undeniably nerdy – by choosing this name, am I condemning my child to playground marginalization?  Is Zephyr too wacky, Ophelia too tragic?

The question isn’t really, Do you dare to give these names to your children, but should you dare?

As many Britberries have pointed out, the names usually found in the Telegraph represent not widespread British naming trends but eccentric aristocratic tastes, so perhaps most of us aren’t debating the merits of Digby and Venetia in any case.

Before we focus on our question, a few trendlets to note: Several girls named Jessica.  Middle names Tom, Sue, and Adventure.  And in a reversal of American style, boys’ names generally more daring than girls’.

Back to the issue at hand: What do you think of these adventurous, intriguing, but perhaps too-challenging names taken from recent Telegraph birth announcements?  Would they work in the U.S….or anywhere else, for that matter?

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Baby Naming Traditions Around the Globe

namingtradit

By Abigail Cukier

As we all know, choosing a name for your baby can be a daunting task. Many factors come into play – trends, tastes, opinions from relatives. But parents are also often guided by religious or cultural traditions. Here are some naming customs from around the world.

Judaism

Personally, when naming my own children, we had to be careful not to choose anything too similar to that of a loved one, because for Ashkenazi Jews this goes against tradition. We usually name a baby after a deceased relative. Some will use the full name, while others use just the first letter. For example, I am named after my grandfather, Arthur.

This is to honour loved ones who have died but also to a superstition. The old belief was that there might be a mix-up and the angel of death might take the baby instead of the older relative.

On the other hand, among Sephardic Jews, who originated in Spain or Portugal, it is actually an honour to name a child after a parent or living relative.

Babies usually receive an English and a Hebrew name. Some parents translate the child’s secular name while others choose a separate Hebrew name.

A boy is named on the eighth day after the birth during the bris (ritual circumcision). Loved ones have the honour of carrying the baby and often the grandfather holds him during the ceremony.  A girl is named in the synagogue, where the father reads from the Torah (Bible) and the baby and mom are blessed.

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posted by: E. Wittig View all posts by this author
sagittarius_constellation

By E. Wittig, aka “Frankie

We’ve just entered the period of the sign of Sagittarius, the archer.  Sagittarius, ruled by Jupiter, is the ninth sign of the zodiac and is represented by a centaur drawing a bow.  Traits said to be shared by people born under the archer are generosity, honesty, and compassion as well as foolishness, pride, and frankness.  They are ethical but impulsive, and have a love of excitement and adventure.  Though the turquoise is their main gemstone, a handful of others represent them as well.

Other elements associated with this sign are the color purple, the narcissus, and the dandelion.  The archer is one of three fire signs along with Leo and Aries.  Here are some astrological names for a baby born between now and December 21st which reflect these attributes:

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posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
germLeni

by Angela Mastrodonato of Upswing Baby Names

My former boss from London once said that when he walked down the streets of Boston for the first time the experience was like, “looking into the eyes of every ethnicity and culture in the world.”

This diversity is a source of pride for many Americans. Consequently, when naming their offspring some Americans like to recognize the country of their ancestors.

And coincidentally most of these ancestors come from countries with lovely lyrical romance languages–languages such as Greek, Italian, and Spanish. There are also many Americans who claim Irish heritage, another source of trendy names.

I envied those Americans. My heritage doesn’t come from a place with a language that was considered lovely or fashionable when I had my kids.

The observant among you may notice my long, vowel-heavy last name that is–yes, Italian–and wonder why I was squawking.

I’m not Italian. Obscured by my married last name is my (mostly) German ancestry.

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walesx

by Linda Rosenkrantz

If you’re looking for a name that reflects your Welsh roots, or simply find the soft sound of names from Wales appealing, there are several possible ways to go.  You could consider Welsh names that have long been used in the US—some of which have far from obvious roots. Then there those currently popular in Wales which have never made their way through US immigration. And, finally, some other, interesting Welsh names worth considering, including some Welsh versions of classics.

WELSH NAMES WITH US CITIZENSHIP

Girls

Branwen

Bronwen

Enid

Gladys

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