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Category: holiday names

What are your favorite holiday names?

holidays

If you’re expecting a baby anytime during the end-of-year holidays, you can’t help but at least muse on the idea of using a holiday-themed name.

Christmas baby names are the most obvious choices, as familiar among people of all faiths as Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: Nicholas and Noel, Holly and Ivy and Merry.

Less widely-known are names that connect to other December holidays.   Names that mean light, such as Zohar and Eleora, relate to Hanukkah, the Jewish Festival of Lights.  Kwanzaa names include Nia and Imani.

And New Year’s baby names range from Aurora to January.

There are names that announce the holidays loud and clear: Solstice, say, or Christmas or Holiday.  Or you might prefer names that reference the holiday season more subtly: Hope, for instance, or Balthazar.

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easter4blog

When it comes to choosing Easter baby names, you don’t have to limit yourself to hopping down the Bunny Trail. There are more subtle options related to the name and time of the holiday itself, to relevant Biblical characters, symbolic animals—bunnies, chicks, and the lamb–plus botanicals, and names whose meanings relate to immortality or rebirth.
Here are the Nameberry picks of the names leading the Easter parade, some as obvious as Lily, others as oblique as the Italian name meaning lamb.

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slidezuzu1

Looking for Christmas names for your holiday-season babe? Well, you can forget about those old chestnut choices like Noel/Noelle, Holly, Natalie, Eve, Merry, Carol and Claus. A much more original idea might be to look at some of the classic and current Christmas movies for interesting character names that would do the job more subtly. But don’t worry– we’re not suggesting Ebenezer or Clarence.

Alonzo

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Alonzo was the name of both the father and the brother (both called by nickname Lon) in the Smith family in this “Have yourself a merry little Christmas” flick, "Meet Me in St. Louis," starring Judy Garland. This dashing Latinate name, which has always ranked in the Top 1000, is ready for wider use. Don’t like Lon? You can call me Al.

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Thanksgiving Names

thanksgiv

There are some wonderful names associated with the Thanksgiving holiday–those that came over on the Mayflower and other early settlers, Puritan Virtue names, ancient harvest gods and goddesses–all fit for a late November baby.  Ahead are:

1. Mayflower Names

2. Ocean-crossing Names

3. Harvest Names

4. Plymouth Bay Colony Names

5. Puritan Virtue Names

6. Turkey Names

7. Other Thanksgiving-related Names

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Easter Names: From Acacia to Pascal

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It’s time again for our annual Easter basketful of names—those that relate directly to the holiday and relevant biblical personages, Easter nature names and names that suggest rebirth.

NAMES OF THE HOLIDAY

Easter – Less common than Christmas but definitely a holiday name that works in its plain English version.

Parasha – A Russian girls’ name that means “born on Good Friday.”

Pascal etc. – There are many attractive versions of this name. The French Pascal, for boys, and Pascale for girls is especially appealing. The Spanish versions are Pascual and Pascuala; Italian is Pasquale.

Pascoe – English twist (Cornish, technically) on the Easter name popular in medieval times. Pasco is another spelling.

Sunday This day name somehow seems best related to the Easter holiday and season.

NAMES OF EASTER PERSONAGES

James, John and Peter – Prayed in the garden with Jesus (but fell asleep)

Joanna – Lesser known Biblical personage who was one of the women at Jesus’ tomb.

Joseph of Arimathea – According to the Bible, wrapped the body of Jesus in a clean shroud and placed it in his own tomb.

Mary Magdalene – The prime female figure in the Easter story, she witnessed the crucifixion, accompanied the body to the tomb, and later with the other women discovered the Resurrection. A saint, she is a symbol of penitence. Her name means “from Magdala.”

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