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10 Favorite Colonial Names for Today

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Colonial Names

By Kara Cavazos @ The Art of Naming

Since tomorrow is Thanksgiving, let’s take a look at some names that were used in Colonial America and could be still considered fashionable today. Colonial names are chock full of history and laced with virtues and biblical associations.

You probably won’t see many boys named Comfort or girls named Modesty today, and something like The-Peace-of-God or Fight-the-good-fight-of-faith wouldn’t exactly work well for official documents. Which led me to wonder what the most usable, wearable names that were favored in early America might be. I narrowed it down to my top 5 boy names and top 5 girl names that date back to the Colonial Era but can still sound fresh today.

I’ve also added a few middle name combo suggestions.

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By Arika Okrent,

The Social Security website has data on the thousand most popular baby names for boys and girls going back to 1880, when John and Mary came in first. A look at the old lists shows that the most popular names are always changing, but some of the naming trends have been around for longer than it might seem. Here are 11 naming trends of the past.


The current list has some names that carry a grand sense of importance (Messiah, King, Marquis), but the 1880s and 90s also had its grand titles in the 200 to 400 range of ranked popularity. For the boys, there was General, Commodore, Prince, and Major. For the girls there was Queen, which hovered around the 500 mark until the 1950s.


Cities as names are not a new thing, however. Boston was a boy’s name in the 1880s. Dallas and Denver have been around since the 1880s, as has Cleveland (though it peaked in popularity during the presidency of Grover Cleveland, so perhaps should count as a president name instead.) Some of our state names come from women’s names, so it is expected that states like Virginia, Carolina, and Georgia should be represented on name lists. But other state names have made the list too. Missouri made the girl’s name list from 1880 until about 1900 and Indiana, Tennessee, and Texas also showed up a few times as girls’ names in the 1800s.

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thanksgiving names

Yes, most of the 102 Pilgrims who arrived on the Mayflower in 1620 and celebrated the first harvest feast in Plymouth were named John and William and Mary and Elizabeth, but there were some unique appellations on the passenger list as well. Here are some of the most interesting.  By Linda Rosenkrantz

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Unusual historic names

By Andy Osterdahl

For the past fifteen years I’ve been collecting and categorizing various oddly named American political figures. In July of 2011, I began to share my findings and established the “Strangest Names in American Political History” blog that presently contains biographies of over 560 unusually named elected officials. In a previous article I wrote for Nameberry in July of 2014, I included examples of the origins of a number of particular names. Since that time I have made a number of new and unusual discoveries!

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November names

By Meagan at TulipByAnyName

November is a festive month brimming with holidays. Many countries will celebrate Thanksgiving, Veterans Day, and All Souls Day. Let’s look at historical events and notable birthdays of past November’s for name inspiration.

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