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Category: girl baby names

popular baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

When the 2013 US Popular Baby Names list came out back in May, we ran Kelli Brady aka The Name Freak‘s wonderful Playground Analysis blog, with her count of the REAL Top 50 baby names. Kelli tallies all spelling variations of the top names to arrive at their actual rankings, which puts Aiden et al instead of Noah at Number 1 for boys, for instance, and bumps Jackson (and Jaxen, Jaxon, and Jaxson) up to Number 2.

Our focus is usually on which names are MORE popular than you’d think when you add in all their spelling variations.  The idea is that parents want to be forewarned when they’re likely to hear their favorite baby names far more often than they’d guess based on the official rankings.  Zoe and Aubrey, counting all spellings, are actually in the Top 10 for girls, for example, while Kayden and his many near-identical twins rank not at Number 93 but at Number 9.

But what about those baby names that are LESS popular than they seem judging by the official statistics?  Parents may veer away from some names, both classic and modern, that are actually somewhat more distinctive than they appear.  I’m not talking about names that are a couple of rungs further down the ladder, based on Kelli‘s analysis, but those that are significantly softer by our own subjective measure.

The point is: If you’re shying away from these baby names because you believe they’re too popular, maybe you owe them a second look.  They are:

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sibling names

This Question of the Week is inspired by a tweet from one of our berries, who said that Pearl and Rome were her two favorite June-inspired baby names.  Both great names, I commented, but would she use them together, for a brother and a sister?  (And in case you’re wondering, her answer was: Of course!)

Which got me thinking about brother and sister names.  Families with two children, one boy and one girl, are the most common configuration in the U.S., so choosing names for one brother and one sister is the naming challenge the greatest number of us will have to face.

So let’s hear your picks for brother and sister names.  If you had to choose names for one boy and one girl, which would you pick…..or which did you pick?  And why?

What are the best brother and sister names you’ve heard?  The not-so-best?  What advice would you give about brother and sister names?

 

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Your Top 5 Girl Names!

best girl names

Let’s have some fun.

List your Top 5 girls’ names.  In order if possible.  With explanations for why you love them so much, if you like.

Your Top 5 might include names you’ve chosen for your own daughter or names you plan to use.  Or it might just be a fantasy list.

And if you can’t limit your list to just five, feel free to add some runners up.

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Names You’ll Be Hearing A Lot More Of

baby name faye

These baby names won’t rank among the most popular when the official statistics are announced next month; many of them won’t even make the Top 1000. But the dozen names here are choices we predict are bound for greater stardom. If you’re looking for a sleeper name likely to gain in style value, or want to avoid a choice that could get a lot more popular, keep your eye on these 12 baby names.

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posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
invented glinda

By Angela Mastrodonato, Upswing Baby Names

With names, as with other subjects, once I learned my assumptions were wrong, I was put in my place.

Pre-kids, I was a name-snob who openly expressed disdain for invented names, grouping all invented names with experimental spellings, and modern word-play creations such as Abcde (ab-si-dee) and La-A (la-dash-ah).

And then shortly after my daughter was born, I discovered I had unintentionally given her an invented name.

No, I didn’t invent the name. The name was invented by an author, and they seem to have a knack for inventing great names. One author known as a master-namer is Shakespeare.

My daughter’s name, Fiona, was first used (and believed to have been invented) by Scottish poet James Macpherson in the 18th century.

Other established names invented by authors are Janice and Vanessa. Certain there must be more author-invented names, I set out to find them.

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