Category: forbidden baby names

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Is Lucifer Off-Limits?

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
Is Lucifer off limits?

The Name Sage finally finds a name she just can’t support. Happily, the mom’s shortlist is packed with other possibilities.

Emma writes:

I am expecting a baby this December, gender unknown, who will join sister Emory.

Since childhood, I have been interested in mythologies and folklore, and I prefer names with a similar background.

My current favorites are Lilith, Cassiel, Castiel, Eilo/Ailo, Asura, Lucifer, and Leviathan/Leviadan, along with Azrael, Seraphiel, Zophiel, Raziel, and Sariel.

I will use nicknames – e.g. Cassiel/Castiel would be Cas, Zophiel would be Zophie or Zoe, etc.

Many of them sound alluring and have such beautiful meanings – like Lucifer means bringer of light.

While I don’t have any problem with them, I worry others will. After all, who names their child after Satan?

What do you think? Is it too much to use these names?

The Name Sage replies:

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posted by: emilygc3 View all posts by this author
iffy baby names

By Emily Cardoza, NothingLikeaName

A friend jokingly asked me the other day if I had ever come across the name “Bourbon” in my name studies. At this point, I’m far less surprised at quirky names than I used to be, so I offered to look it up for real. Despite its similar sound to Brandon and Brayden, Bourbon has not surfaced as a name in US records. But it got me thinking – what other alcoholic names are on birth certificates?

Below, I’ve included a list of names and the number of babies born with the name in its most popular year. 

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verboden

Nameberry 9 by Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

A French film made its US debut this week.  What’s in a Name? takes us to a dinner party.  A happy couple announces that they’re expecting a son, and they’ve chosen a name.

Adolphe.

It’s as scandalous a choice in French as it would be in English, and the fellow guests are aghast.

The party goes downhill from there.  Other guests are criticized for their children’s “pretentious” names: Myrtille and Apollin.

Such scathing comments are usually reserved for gossip, or maybe anonymous online forums.  Can you imagine yourself in a social setting, hearing your child’s name ripped to shreds?  Let’s hope the movie – and the play it is based on – are pure fiction.

Then again, even if Adolf is your beloved grandfather’s given name, I would think long and hard about giving the name to a son.  It’s one of a very few names, like Lucifer, that strike me as off limits for good reason.

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Forbidden Baby Names: Where to draw the line?

abby--9-17-12a

In her Nameberry 9 this week, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel ponders whether there are some names that cross the line– whether there are such things as forbidden baby names.

This week’s baby name news has me wondering: what makes a name truly off limits?  I don’t mean names that just aren’t your style, but names that actually strike you as inappropriate, even unfair, to give to a child.

It’s a tough line to draw.  Some names are fine until they’re paired with a specific surname, like famed Texas philanthropist Ima Hogg.  Others have associations that are difficult to shake, be they positive or otherwise.  Would you name a child Elmo? Adolf seems like a burden, but what if your beloved grandpa was an Adolf?

Creative respellings put many parents off, while others have negative reactions to surnames, invented names, place names … the list is endless.  But when does it cross the line from not for me, thanks, into who does that?

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Forbidden Baby Names

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When a name like Talula Does The Hula from Hawaii gets banned, it makes big news. But there are lots of other names that, now and since the beginning of recorded name time, have quietly been relegated to the forbidden list.  No judge may have pounded a gavel, no name-sensitive Napoleon decreed a law against outlandish names as he did in France.  But these names have nevertheless been shunned by parents in the Western World – and sometimes even by those who’ve been unlucky enough to be born with them.

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