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Category: Flemish names

Dutch Names: The current and the classic

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There are many unfamiliar but intriguing Dutch names, and today’s native-born guest blogger, Veronique, gives us an inside picture of what’s hot today in the Netherlands and Flanders–and how to pronounce them.

What makes a name Dutch? A name that is typically Dutch is one that occurs frequently in the Netherlands and/or in Flanders, the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium. In recent years many of the names in the Top 20 have been international names like Emma and Marie for girls and Lars and Luca for boys, so my main focus won’t be on those names that originated elsewhere.

As you may know, Dutch names can be quite hard to pronounce for non-native speakers of Dutch. Actress Famke Janssen changed her last name from Beumer to Janssen because Americans pronounced it as ‘bummer.’ And when Matt Lauer and his wife welcomed their third child, a son named Thijs, they explained that the name was pronounced as ‘tice.’ Now that is not entirely true: if you ask for ‘tice’ in a Dutch speaking country, chances are you will get Thai food. The correct pronunciation lies somewhere between ‘tice’ and ‘tayes’. Because ‘eu’ or ‘ij’ are so hard to pronounce for non-native speakers of Dutch, I’m excluding names that contain those sounds from my list of typical names that might appeal outside the Dutch culture.

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Belgian Names: Beyond Flemish and French

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Belgian native and guest blogger Sarah B. unscrambles the pieces of the complicated jigsaw puzzle that is the diverse naming structure of her native land by analyzing its Most Popular list of 2010.

Belgium is a small country with a mere 10 million inhabitants. Yet it sits right in the heart of Western Europe (the capital, Brussels, is often called the ‘capital of Europe’), and so is subject to more varied cultural influences than perhaps any other European country. One result of this is that Belgium has no less than three official languages: Dutch, spoken in the northern part of the country called Flanders (this variety is called Flemish– the differences between Dutch and Flemish are comparable to the differences between British and American English); French, spoken in the southern part of the country, called Wallonia; and German, spoken in a small part of Wallonia bordering Germany.

These three languages cause important differences when it comes to naming our babies, and this is why separate statistics are kept for the three parts of the country. Some names are popular in the whole of Belgium, but these names will usually be popular in all of Europe and even beyond (Emma is an example).

Being Flemish, I will limit myself to the names popular in Flanders. Here is the Flemish Top 10 for 2010 so far–( names given in Flanders only, regardless of their origin):

Girls

 Marie
 Emma
 Lotte
 Julie
 Ella
 Louise
 Noor
 Elise
 Lore
 Fien

Boys
 Louis
 Daan
 Lucas
 Milan
 Kobe
 Lars
 Mathis
 Liam
 Wout
 Senne

These Top 10 names popular in Flanders can be further divided into five different categories: International, Dutch, French, Flemish and a smaller group  of English names,  clearly showing Flanders’ central position in Europe, and the varied cultural influences involved.

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