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Category: eccentric baby names

Unusual British Baby Names

British baby names

The British are known as much for their eccentricity as for their conventionality, two stereotypes evidenced in the names from the recent birth announcements in the London Telegraph.

Yes, there are plenty of boys named the traditional Henry and Oliver and lots of girls called the Number 1 Amelia and the very proper Charlotte.

Sometimes, the two images cross, with the same eccentric (to American ears, at least) names being used so often they begin to feel conventional.  The first three months of 2014, for instance, seem to be rife with girls named Matilda and Ottilie and boys named every variation of Fred: Frederick and Wilfred and Alfred and Freddie.

But what we’re focusing on today are the truly eccentric names, the one-offs and the unusual choices that may prove fashion forward or may just be evidence of the infamous British wackiness.  These eccentric new names fall into several different camps.

The first and largest might be thought of as the mainstream eccentric British names, such as:

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Royal-Baby

How would you describe your favorite name style?, asked a recent Nameberry Question of the Week. Do you prefer cool names?  Classic?  Stylish?  Or what?

Which put me in mind of trying to characterize my own name style.  You might think that we at Nameberry were born knowing our personal name styles, since we’ve made a life’s work of classifying names into styles and helping other people figure out what kinds of names they love.

But like the shoemaker’s child, I’d never really defined my own name style until Linda posted this question.  I definitely like vintage names, I decided, along with names that are a bit unusual.  Cool names, but not too cool.  Classy, yet quirky.

And then the right term for it came to me: Eccentric Aristocrat.   You know, the kind of names that might belong to madcap lords and exotic baronesses (baronessi?) dashing around the countryside in yellow roadsters, drinking champagne and weekending at castles.

Yes, it’s a little bit British, but it’s also kind of Eurotrash and pretty F. Scott Fitzgerald and Edith Wharton sophisticated American too.   Eccentric Aristocrat names hint at a Russian count as a grandfather, a Scottish pile as an inheritance, ancient relatives who have to be honored with highly unfashionable names – except now that you think about it, those names are actually kind of cool.

Regular readers of Nameberry will recognize the Eccentric Aristocrat in many of the names that, not coincidentally, are favorites on this site: Violet and Jasper, Flora and Felix.  Those are the kinds of names that I’d choose for my own children.  (The fact that I didn’t choose those kinds of names for my own children is another story, one that starts with my husband’s name style being more Solid Midwestern than Eccentric Aristocrat.)

A few rules on what makes a name an Eccentric Aristocrat:

1.   It must be rooted in tradition, but not traditional. So: Circe yes, Charles no.   Edward no, Edgar yes.

2.   It must have a distinct gender identification, but not a conventional one. The name Inigo is clearly male, while India plainly female.   Yet Inigo might just as well design clothes as play football, and India seems as appropriate a name for an international financier as for a supermodel.

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london1

I relish the days when, in the service of nameberry, I allow myself to click through to the birth announcements in Britain’s Daily Telegraph.  The upper-crusty British baby name trends and eccentric (to the American ear) name combinations, oblivious to any conventional notions of “flow,” are my idea of top-flight entertainment.

For my latest survey, I set myself the task of listing only those offbeat names that reflect the English sensibility but are rarely heard heard in the United States – or indeed anywhere else in the world. (They may be rarely heard in Britain too — there are lots more Thomases than Teklas — yet they’re in keeping with upper-class British style.)

What I didn’t suspect was how many of them there were.  Choices that originally seemed natural for the list – Henrietta and Imogen, for instance – had to be offloaded to make way for more extraordinary names.

What remains is a selection of quirky British baby names (not all of them actual English choices), many of which are utterly (utterly, dahling!) charming and could bear far more use in the larger world.

Girls

AMBERLEY Rose

AMOR Matilda Grace

ARAMINTA Tyger Grace

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