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Category: creative names for boys

Nameberry Picks: 8 Best Color Names

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Color names come complete with their own imagery, everything that’s emblematic of the color they represent.  The best of the color names make vivid choices for any child.  Here, our eight favorite .

Crimson

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If Scarlett and Ruby are too pop culture for you, you might want to opt for the showier Crimson.

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Baby Names 2010: The Also-Rans

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We’ve obviously been spending too much time in the depths of nameberry, checking out which names our visitors have been checking out.

And while Finn and Charlotte are the most-searched names for the first nine months of the year, and while we recently brought you our own nameberry Top 100 Baby Names 2010 for both boys and girls, we know some of you still want more.

What’s number 101, for instance?  Which names are flying below the official nameberry radar, not attracting enough views to make our 2010 most popular names lists, but still attracting thousands of views?

Here’s a selection.  This group does not include all the names right below the official Top 100, just those we found the most interesting.

There are lots of unusual and intriguing choices here, but for nameberry, that’s normal.

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Hurricane Names: Oddballs on the Lists

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Reflecting upon recent hurricanes, Nameberry’s newest intern Deanna Cullen delved into “the eye of the storm,” so to speak, and returned with a flood of information on the hurricane naming process.

Mother Nature gives birth to a whole set of little terrors each hurricane season, so it’s only natural that we have a set of names by which to reprimand them- six sets of names, actually.

You don’t have to be a Weather Channel enthusiast to know that hurricane names are, by design, short, distinctive male and female names, listed in alphabetical order each year . What you may not know, however, is who is responsible for naming the hurricanes and why odd names like Gaston and Virginie made the 2010 list.

Since 1979, there have been six lists in rotation for Atlantic hurricane names, each established and maintained by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

A sanity check for all of you who may have thought “I swear I remember a hurricane with that name before…:” You’re right. Each list is repeated every seventh year, so this year’s list will reappear in 2016.

An exception to the rule. If a storm is so deadly or catastrophic that its continued use would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity, the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected by the WMO committee to replace it. Katrina, Floyd, and Ike? All gone.

So how are new names decided upon by the WMO? Just like any proud mother and father, a lot of thought goes into naming a newborn.

The committee takes into consideration the public’s response toward a name.  While a child with a complicated name may become exasperated by teachers’ constant mispronunciation of their names, a complicated hurricane name could have more catastrophic consequences. Thus, hurricane names should be easy to recall and on the shorter side.

The popularity of the first letter in a name is also a factor in the naming process. Current lists exclude Q, U, X, Y, and Z due to the dearth of names starting with those letters (Though hurricane names from 1958 included Udele, Virgy, Xrae, Yurith, and Zorna.)

The committee also considers ethnic names. Atlantic Ocean hurricanes, much like many of our country’s immigrants, have ties with European nations. Thus, the names may be French, Spanish, and English, in lieu of the  major languages bordering the Atlantic Ocean.

Here are some hurricane names that really stand out (and haven’t made it into the Top 1000 in the last ten years), whether their respective hurricanes have been but a blip on the radar or otherwise.

On this year’s list:

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Boys’ Names 2010: Most Popular So Far

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There’s a new Number One boys’ name three-quarters of the way through the year.  Finn beat out Henry to become the most popular of the boys’ names 2010, as the most-searched male name on nameberry for the nine months that just ended.

This is big news, not least because well-liked classic Henry got trumped by a quirky ethnic upstart.  Of course, we’re talking most searched name here, not most used, and this is nameberry, where the patrons’ taste in names tends to be more sophisticated and distinctive than at your average baby-naming site.

Still, reaching Number One – not just for the third quarter, mind you, but for all of 2010 so far – is quite a distinction.  So congratulations, Finn, and we’re sure we’ll be seeing you near the top of the official popularity lists one year soon.

The other major boy name trend evidenced here is the predominance of two-syllable names, with a full two-thirds of nameberry’s most popular boys’ names 2010 having two syllables and 17 more having (like Finn) just one.

In other news, these names are newcomers to nameberry’s Top 100 Boys’ Names 2010:

They replace these, which have fallen off the Top 100:

Names moving up the ladder for the second time in a row include the following, which we now have officially on trend watch:

Names making the biggest leaps upward are:

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Boys’ Names: Unusual, Stylish Picks

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Looking for boys’ names that feel contemporary and stylish but that you won’t hear coming and going?  Here are our picks of unusual boys’ names – used for fewer than 100 boys, but at least 50 (those borders were picked to keep the collection manageable) – that are in step with today’s fashions.

It’s not so surprising, for the most part, that these names are used for so few boys.  And we don’t expect most of them to make huge leaps in popularity.  The few exceptions we think we’ll hear considerably more of in years to come: Wiley and Wylie, Ford, Fox, Lazarus, Chester, and West.

But we think any one of these unusual boys’ names would sound perfectly appropriate for a modern baby boy.  If you really want a name that’s different, look no further.

For more choices, see our complete list of boys’ names used for five or more babies in 2009.

The first group are traditional (more or less) first names. The number represents how many boys received the name last year.

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