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Above-aVERage Names for Boys

posted by: Kara Blakley View all posts by this author
baby boy names

By Kara Blakley

I recently wrote about some VERy exciting names for girls, and now it’s time for the boys’ list.

Recently, Brooke Cussans wrote about PERfect names: a wonderfully diverse list of names all sharing the PER syllable.I was inspired to create a list of VER names, and found that like PER, this sound leads to a diverse list of names that are fresh and vibrant. VER names are so plentiful, in fact, that the list is divided into girls and boys. Now, here are the best VER names for boys.

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The Hottest Names of 2015

hottest baby names

by Pamela Redmond Satran

By now we’ve all heard about the most popular baby names of 2014, but what about the top names of 2015 and next year and beyond?

How can the intelligent baby namer find out which names will become even hotter — and maybe overheated — in the future?

Way back in 2011, we published a “secret popularity list” of girls’ names and boys’ names attracting the biggest jumps in views among our visitors.  The result: An amazingly accurate look at baby names that would become much more popular over the coming years.  Among the names we pegged as hot were Aria, Margot, and Vivian for girls; Cassius, Josiah, and Lennon for boys.

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What are the best cool, unusual baby names?

cool unusual baby names

The two most popular lists on Nameberry are our rosters of Best Cool Unusual Girls’ Names and Best Cool Unusual Boys’ Names.

It stands to reason why these lists get so much attention: They contain dozens of names that are attractive yet uncommon, have authentic roots yet are usable in the modern world.

So now we turn the question back on you: What do you think are the best of the best cool, unusual baby names for either or both genders?

Feel free to pull from our widely-read lists or add choices of your own.

Photo from one of our favorite crafting sites, Delia Creates, full of cool, unusual ideas like this one.

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Baby Name Trends: Sleek, simple, cool names

cool baby names

By Pamela Redmond Satran

People often ask us how we come up with our baby name trend predictions.

The short answer: It’s a mix of science and inspiration, with a dash of magic.

One of our major predictions for baby names 2015, for instance, was a trend toward short, simple names.  The basis for this prediction was scientific: These names are now stylish and popular throughout Europe, and the names themselves are both fresh and easily translated to the American culture.

But now suddenly we see that trend for sleek, cool names really taking off, and here’s where the magic comes in.  First, early this morning, we noticed extremely positive comments on the Nameberry pages for both Jude and Lux, perfect examples of this kind of short, modern, stylish name.

And then, just as we were beginning to compile a list of similar names we saw as fitting the same attractive mold, we opened the New York Times magazine to read about a hot new clothing company called Kit and Ace, named for two prototypical millennials who personify the cutting-edge brand.

In the baby name trend predicting world, three influences like this from three different sources — international statistics, grass-roots comments, and the fashion world — add up to a bona fide trend.

And then a fourth item drove the idea home: Abby Sandel’s Monday column right here on Nameberry, discussing all the new celebrity baby names that fit the short, simple trend.

Here, our picks for baby names that embody this major trend toward sleek, simple, cool names.  Most of these move beyond traditional choices such as Bill and Anne but stop short of being word names or nature names such as Wren or Snow (though there are selections here that veer toward both the traditional and the nature categories).  But the best of them, to our mind, live somewhere in the middle.

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British baby names

The Top 100 names of England and Wales are resplendent with choices that feel a lot more chic and surprising in the US than they must in the UK.

Freya, for instance, the Norse goddess name that’s become a Top 20 staple on the other side of the pond, just cracked the US Top 1000.  Florence, which has been stylish in the UK for decades now and still stands at Number 29, fell off the US Top 1000 in 1982 and has yet to reappear.  Harriet is Number 61 in the UK while it hasn’t been on the US Top 1000 since the 1970s, while Martha stands at Number 73 in the UK and rising yet is at 803 and sinking in the US.

The boys’ Top 100 in the UK includes names such as Arthur, Freddie and Frederick, Louis, and Stanley that rank much lower in the US.

Below the UK Top 100, it’s impossible to quantify baby name trends as statistics don’t exist.  Instead, we must rely on anecdotal evidence: What fashionable young parents in Shoreditch and Swansea are naming their babies, compared with names considered stylish in Soho (the New York one) and Silver Lake.  While there are some similarities — fashionable parents on both sides of the pond love Iris and Oscar, Ada and Arthur — there are many fascinating differences in taste.

Our prime examples of names that are more stylish on the UK side of the pond than the US:

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