Category: boys’ names for girls

posted by: NameFreak! View all posts by this author
girlish boy

by Kelli Brady at namefreak!

As I go through the Top 100 girl names from the late 1800’s and early 1900’s, I notice that quite a few are the feminine form of male names. It’s noticeable because it is such a big difference from the current trend of unisex names. Most feminine form names have disappeared from the top in favor of names that either are unisex or were originally male names. Take a look:

Top 100 from 1880-1930
Twist on Male Names            Male/Unisex Names Given to Girls
Caroline                                              Billie
Charlotte                                            Carol
Georgia                                               Marion
Geraldine                                            Ollie
Jacqueline                                           Willie
Josephine
Leona
Louise
Maxine
Norma
Patricia
Pauline
Roberta

Top 100 from 2012
Twist on Male Names           Male/Unisex Names Given to Girls
Brianna                                                Ashley
Caroline                                               Aubrey
Charlotte                                             Avery
Makayla                                               Bailey
.                                                           Brooklyn
.                                                           Harper
.                                                           Kennedy
.                                                           Mackenzie
.                                                           Morgan
.                                                           Peyton
.                                                           Reagan
.                                                           Riley
.                                                           Skylar
.                                                           Sydney
.                                                           Taylor

It’s interesting to see the “masculine” preference change from a form of a masculine name to the actual masculine (or unisex) name.

How do you feel about the change in preference? Are there any feminine form names you wish would return to the Top 100?

Originally posted at NameFreak! on May 22, 2013 and revised for Nameberry.

Kelli Brady is a stay at home mom of two who needed an outlet for her name obsession. She found it at NameFreak!, a blog dedicated to a wide variety of name-related whims and fancies. You can also follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

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celebrity baby names

Not that this is something completely new.  After all, way back when, Diane Keaton named her daughter Dexter Dean, Kelsey Grammer had girls called Spencer and Mason, and Miley Cyrus’s parents named their next daughter Noah.  But lately the trend of celebrities giving their female offspring completely male— not unisex— names has been wildly escalating.  Here are some of the most extreme gender-benders. (And if you haven’t already, be sure to check out our great new graphic showing just where every unisex name stands on the boy-girl spectrum.)

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abby-4-8---arya

This week’s Nameberry 9 by Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel shows us the wide range of girl baby names available to today’s parents.

Did you read Swistle’s post about a woman named Justin?

Some of us probably felt vindicated.  Of course you shouldn’t give a boy’s name to a girl!

Others probably thought: If only they’d chosen Justine instead.

Miss Justin might be an extreme case, but this week’s name news reminds us that the range of possibilities for girls is vast.  From conventionally masculine names to modern inventions to antique revivals, we are willing to be daring when naming daughters.

That’s not just a name nerd perspective, either.  In 2011, almost 79% of newborn boys in the US received a Top 1000 name.  For girls?  Just under 67% received a Top 1000 choice.

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y

Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel has found some intriguingly unusual baby names in this week’s name news.

It’s easy to belittle a parent’s search for a unique name.  Headlines call it self-centered and short-sighted.  But if you went through school as Jessica or Jennifer, one among many, is it so wrong to want your child to be one of one, at least in her kindergarten?

This week was all about the quest for a distinctive name.

There was nothing truly surprising in the baby name news – no Buddy Bear Maurice or Rainbow Aurora.  Instead, there’s been a treasure trove of very wearable names that all feel just a little bit different.

What makes them stand out choices?  For some, it’s a high value Scrabble letter, like V, X, or Z.  Others are super short, even brisk.  And giving a masculine name to a daughter is always a sure-fire way to grab attention, for better and for worse.

Not every parent would – or should – consider every trend, but it is exciting just how many choices manage to be both unusual and perfectly normal at once.

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rebel

Watch out, Berries–today’s guest blogger, Claire Shefchik, has plenty of bones to pick!

Since the age of six, I’ve loved names.  Back then, whenever I renamed myself, I was Crystal (spelled Christal) and later, Jordan.  These days, I prefer Presley to Penelope, Jayden to Jasper.  In the novel I’m writing, two of the main characters are Dempsey and Vaughanfemale characters. Eek!  That’s right, I am a name heretic.

When, a few years ago, I came across the Nameberry-led community of Internet naming enthusiasts, I thought I’d found heaven (sorry, “nevaeh”).  But I found myself, more often than not, at odds with my fellow “name nerds.”  Many claim to be open-minded and liberal, but are much more rigid in their approach to naming than you’d think, especially when it comes to names popular with, as one poster put it, “the WalMart set.”  Another poster declared her goal was to encourage “classically-named babies,” which let’s face it, is just a euphemism for “babies with names of which I, as the self-appointed arbiter of taste, approve.”

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