Names Searched Right Now:

Category: baby naming

What’s YOUR Question of the Week?

QOW2

We’ve now posed more than sixty Questions of the Week– covering topics from nicknames to namesakes to namenapping to name crushes.  But I’ll bet there’s some query you’ve been wishing we’d put on the table.  Maybe it’s a topic that’s been up on the Message Boards that you’d like to hear further opinions on.  Maybe it’s something that hasn’t been discussed at all.

For that reason,  we’re turning the tables this week and asking you berries to suggest a future Question of the Week.  We’ll pick the most provocative one(s) and post it here.

Read More

Post Categories:
remorse4

The question of the week: Have you ever experienced namer’s remorse?

This is a term heard more and more frequently in the baby name world, describing the feeling of parents when they think they could have made a better choice for their child.

Have you ever regretted picking the name you picked?

If so, was this an immediate reaction as soon as you saw your baby, or did it happen later, when it just didn’t feel like the right fit?

Or did it happen when the name became mega-popular—or when you came to realize that it already was?

A compromise choice you regret making?

A response to negative reactions you got when people heard the name?  Spelling or pronunciation problems?

Was it just a twinge or was your remorse strong enough for you to consider actually making a legal change?

Anyone out there who did make a change?

Read More

literary3

I remember how, when I first read the novels of Evelyn Waugh and the plays of George Bernard Shaw, a whole new universe of names opened up for me. A world of sophisticated, eccentric, kind of uppity and veddy veddy Victorian and Edwardian  British names, many of which I had never heard before, but instantly became enamored with.

The comic novels of Waugh and P.G. Wodehouse and the plays (and novel) of Oscar Wilde and Shaw are still a good place to start if you’re looking for a name with a certain elegance, gentility, swank—and sometimes a bit of quirkiness as well.

GIRLS

Read More

Would you use a name from another culture?

multicult2

This is the nameberry question of the week: Would you  give your child a name from an ethnicity other than your own?

….more specifically, would you choose a name which has not been fully integrated into Anglo-American nomenclature and would be in contrast to your surname?

Sometimes this can make for a felicitous combination–one example  that springs to mind is newscaster Soledad O’Brien.  And there are certainly plenty of Seans and Ryans with non-Gaelic/Celtic surnames.

But how about you?  If your last name was Magee, would you name your son Adriano?

If your surname was Greenberg, would you call your daughter Siobhan?

Or do you feel that a child’s name should reflect his/her own ethnic ancestry?

Read More

Are You Honest About Names?

crossed fingers

The question of the week: how honest are you about names?

In all of our books and here on nameberry, Linda and I are dedicated to telling parents that their baby’s name is their choice and theirs alone, that they should tune out well-meaning relatives and friends and, yes, even strangers who criticize a name they love.

But what about when expectant parents ask for advice about names?  What about when they ask youDo you tell them what you really think, or do you keep your harsher opinions to yourself?

Denizens of the nameberry forums are often experts at the diplomatic response to names they’re not crazy about.  “Not my style,” is one very nice way of signaling thumbs down about a name.

Some people say that, when asked, you should give your honest opinion on name possibilities before the baby is born, but stifle yourself once the name has already been chosen.

Others say that negative opinions on names, no matter when or by whom or in what tone they’re offered, are always offensive.

What do YOU think? C’mon, now, tell us the truth…be honest.

Read More