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oscars

By Linda Rosenkrantz

A couple of weeks ago we covered the Golden Globe nominee names, and now, as predicted and promised, we have a wider field to pick from with the new Oscar nominations, which include a wide range of behind-the-scenes people.  Not surprisingly, as a reflection of the gender imbalance in the industry, there are a lot more boys’ than girls’ names.

So here are some of the best names that were not included on the Golden Globes slate, with several interesting international choices in the mix.

GIRLS

Adruitha –(Adruitha Lee, Makeup and Hairstyling, Dallas Buyers Club) A completely unique name—Adruitha Lee is reputedly the only Adruitha listed in any U.S. phone book.

Celestine—(French Animated Feature title, Ernest and Celestine) In this charming French animated film, Celestine is a mouse—but one who is an artist and a dreamer. Celestine is a pretty, crystalline diminutive of Celeste, commonly heard on its native soil.

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abby1-13-13

By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

What’s the 2014 equivalent of the old phrase “Every Tom, Dick, and Harry?”

Every Aiden, Mason, and Jake?

Every Max, Zac, and Jackson?

The most popular names for boys used to hold steady for years.  In 1932, the ten most popular names for boys born in the US were Robert, James, John, William, Richard, Charles, Donald, George, Joseph, and Thomas.  Twenty years later, eight of those ten names were still dominant.  Fast-forward to the 1980s, and 30% of the 1932 boys’ Top Ten still ranked.

As for the girls?  That’s a different picture.  Between 1932 and 1952, seven of the girls’ Top Ten fell.  Shirley and Doris made way for Linda and Susan, and the change has continued at a rapid pace.  None of the 1930s or 1950s girls’ favorites still held a top spot by 2012.

And yet there are more wearable names for boys than ever before.  Plenty of parents are still passing down grandpa Joseph’s name, but the pressure to do so seems to be on the decline.  We live in a more accepting age, where diversity in names feels quite normal.

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new years

If you’re shopping for a New Year’s baby name, there are several routes you could take. You might choose January, à la Ms. Jones or Eve à la New Year’s. Or you could pick a name whose meaning celebrates the hope brought by a new year, like Nadia or Esperanza—or Hope. Or one that suggests the dawn of a new year, such as Aurora or Oriana—or Dawn. But you could also go down the namesake path, paying tribute to a notable bearer of a name who entered the world on New Year’s Eve or Day.  Here, eleven worth namesakes born on December 31 or January 1.

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