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Category: baby name updates

TV Character Names: So what’s new?

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Every new TV season or so we like to check out the recently launched shows, as well as those still running, for any interesting names that have emerged since the last time we looked. Most scripters continue to come up with the obvious and the formulaic, giving their characters names like Jessica and Jeff and Rick and Robin, Amy and Andy.

But there are some who do think out of the box—though usually for not more than one character per show.  The list below steers clear of reality shows, so no Khloes or Kourtneys, and no cartoon characters or kiddie shows.

Girls

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How To Update Old Nickname Names

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In 1963, there were 23,900 baby girls named Lori, the same year that there were 21,191 little Tammys and 11,000 Cindys, not to mention all the Mindys, Mandys, Marcys, and Marnies with the then modern-sounding nicknamey, quasi-unisex, names popular from the mid-fifties and into the next couple of decades.

So is it any wonder that so many of today’s parents have moms and sometimes grandmothers with these vintage nickname names?

But as much as we love those family members, and would like to make them namesakes, would we really want to name our own little girls Mindy or Cindy?  Probably would be  better to seek a related substitute that would still serve to honor them.

Here are a few random update ideas, some that relate fairly directly to the mother name, others that are a bit more of a stretch.

                 More obvious: Candace

                 Less obvious: Candida (and yes, we do know its downside) or Dulcie (means sweet)

                More obvious: Caroline

                 Less obvious: Carys

                 More obvious: Lucinda

                 Less obvious: Signy/Signe

                 More obvious: Daria

                 Less obvious: Dorothy

                 More obvious: Jamison

                 Less obvious: Jamaica or Jane

                 More obvious: Josie

                 Less obvious: Josephine

                 More obvious: Jolie

                 Less obvious: Joanna

                 More obvious: Keira

                 Less obvious: Kerensa

                 More obvious: Laurel or Laura

                 Less obvious: Lorelei

                 More obvious: Amanda

                 Less obvious: Manon

                 More obvious: Marcella

                 Less obvious: Maribel

                More obvious: Marlo/Marlowe

                 Less obvious: Marin

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We’ve been keeping a pretty close watch on English and Irish birth announcements, but it’s been a while since we’ve checked out the Scottish.

Traditional Scottish names still prevail—for boys lots of Calums and Callums, Finlays, Camerons, Lewises and Murrays, along with Jacks, Gabriels, Charlies and Aarons.  For girls, Charlotte, Chloe, Eva, Leah and Lily seem to be particular favorites, as are increasing numbers of little Maisies and Daisys.  And nickname names continue to flourish for both boys and girls.

So here, from across the country—Arbroath to Berwick to Perth to the Isle of Lewis, are some of the more interesting names and combinations that have been announced in Scottish newspapers over the past two months, together with some of their sibs.

GIRLS

ANONA CLARK

AURELIA ESME

BEATRICE MORVEN

CATRIONA MAY

COCO MAE (sister of LOUIS RAY and JESSE JAMES)

CONNIE ALEXA (sister of MORAY), CONNIE ANN MAY

CORIN AMELIE

CORINNE FAITH (sister of Cara, Kai, Cole and Kristin)

DAISY JASMINE

DEMIE ADA-JAYNE (sister of OLLIE EDWARD)

EDEN ROSE

EILIDH (pron AY-lee) LINDA, EILIDH MAIRI (sister of IAIN and FINLAY);  EILIDH MARGARETE

ELISHA MAE

ELLIE JANE

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Nameberry guest blogger Andrea, whom many of you may know for her intelligent and thoughtful advice on our message boards, and who most recently blogged for us on royal baby names, now focuses her attention closer to home, with this report on naming trends in the midwest.

On a recent Saturday somewhere in North Dakota, an athletic field was filled with fledgling 4-year-old soccer players, learning how to kick the ball and congratulate teammates when they did (or didn’t) make a goal. Behind them were their proud parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and volunteer coaches, all hollering at once:

Maddox, where’s your soccer ball?” “Yay, Logan. Yay, Logan!” “Hustle, Camden, hustle!” “Chloe, take a time out.” “Go, Ethan!”  After awhile the hard “C’s” and “an” ending names started to blend together. I could imagine next year’s preschool or kindergarten teacher mixing some of them up the way their soccer coach occasionally did.

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It’s always interesting to take a look at which names are most popular where.  You can usually count on some surprises and this year is no exception.  For instance Anna ranking in the top five in both Alabama and Mississippi, when it’s down at 29 across the country, and Logan, which is #17 on the Social Security list, now the #1 boys’ name in three widespread states—Idaho, Minnesota and New Hampshire.

Repeating the pattern of last year, the majority of names that popped out from the crowd were in the boys’ column; for the girls’ names across the country there was a remarkable uniformity of choice—with Isabella, Emma, Olivia, Madison, or Ava heading the list in all but two states, while on the male side, there were several top singletons, such as Wyatt in Wyoming and Ryan in Massachusetts.

But what are really most intriguing are the names that jump out of nowhere in one particular place—some of them throwbacks, some predictive of future popularity, some reflecting the state’s ethnicity, such as Gianna in New Jersey and José, the most common name in Texas.

Here are some of the names that were not even in the Top 25 nationally, but rated high in specific areas, with their national ratings in parenthesis:

ALLISON  (30)—     #1 in the District of Columbia

ANNA (29)  —          #4 in Alabama

BROOKLYN (37)      #4 in Utah

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