Names Searched Right Now:

Category: baby name Tallulah

Archives

Categories

blueivy

By Linda Rosenkrantz

There are some names that we’ve become so accustomed to seeing on the covers of People et al, attached to the babes of Tinseltown, that we assume that their popularity has instantly spread beyond the confines of Malibu and Calabasas.  But it ain’t necessarily so.  There are several appellations worn by more than one starbaby that have yet to hit the current Top 1000 list—though this could change with the new rankings coming next month! Some of these names did have some nineteenth or twentieth century success, others have never entered the list at all.

GIRLS

Alabama—Used by Drea de Matteo and Shooter Jennings and by Travis Barker for their daughters, this Southern state name—unlike neighboring Georgia and Carolina—appeared only once on the Social Security list, and that was in 1881.

BlueBeyonce and Jay Z made quite the colorful splash when they named their daughter Blue Ivy; several years earlier Dave Evans dubbed his girl Blue Angel.  Many others have picked Blue as the middle name for their kids–both girls and boys–including Maria Bello, Soleil Moon Frye and Veronica Webb, but the name has not yet entered the popularity list.

Read More

posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
americano

By Angela Mastrodonato of upswingbabynames

Often an inspiration for artwork and music, classic Americana is an untapped resource for baby names rich in history and culture.

These names have American roots. These names have an American image, but (with some exceptions) most aren’t even popular in America. But they have styles appealing to many American parents.

Girls

America Admittedly this is not a surprising pick. What is surprising is how long America has been around as a given name. America first came into use as a given name in America in the 19th century. The name first made the Social Security top 1000 list back in 1880, the earliest year for name rankings.

Read More

abby-7-15-13

By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

The world is awaiting a royal birth announcement, and I’ll admit I’m unreasonably excited.

But it is different this time, isn’t it?

A high-profile arrival usually comes complete with a headline-grabbing given name. There’s North and Knox and Rainbow Aurora, Apple, Hattie and Everly, Zuma and Bronx Mowgli.

Some are prime for imitation, and catch on with non-Hollywood types. Others are unlikely to be used by anyone other than celebrity parents, and while unusual names are more accepted than ever, Suri has yet to crack the US Top 1000.

This time we know one thing for certain: the prince or princess won’t have a wacky name. I suppose Kate and William could slip in a quirky Anglo-Saxon royal as an extra middle – Elswith or Athelstan or Godwin. But the couple doesn’t seem likely to go that route.

Instead, we’ll be celebrating an evergreen classic of a name, the kind that we too often ignore.

Read More

Baby Name Stories: The Nameberry 9

abby3-5

This week Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel poses the question: Can a great story influence the way you think about a name?

We berries know that names others dismiss as strange, even wacky, are often mainstream.  Jackson has eclipsed John, and many girls’ names in use only a few decades are among the most popular in the US.  Neveah, Brooklyn, and Kaylee, I’m looking at you.

But if you are going to use an eye-poppingly strange name, I’m convinced the way to do it is to have a great story, one that your child won’t mind re-telling again and again.  And again.  Actually, you’d better be willing to re-tell your tale, too, as curious types coo at your sweet little newborn babe and ask if McKechnie is a family name.

Nancy shared a great article about two women with truly unique names earlier this week, and my theory held up.  Bluzette experienced frustrating moments, especially as a kid, but mostly she’s made peace with her unusual name, inspired by a song.  Open, who lacks a simple backstory, still struggles with her appellation.

Of course the biggest name this week requires no explanation.  Jen and Ben went with an all-boy Biblical staple never out of US Top 100 for baby #3.  The littlest Affleck kicks off our nine most newsworthy baby names this week:

Read More

Nameberry Picks: 12 Best Glamour Girl Names

glamour1

From the early days of silent pictures to the present day, a sprinkling of stardust has stuck to the names of some of the most iconic glamour girls. Whether their allure was sexy or serene, these superstars’ names make Nameberry’s top dozen.

Audrey– The radiant Belgian-born actress (born Edda), style icon and humanitarian lent a luminous glow to her name– an Old English saint’s appellation– which is being appreciated anew by modern parents, who have brought it into the Top 50.

Ava – One of the great hits of the decade, Ava still calls up the image of sultry Hollywood beauty Ava Gardner.  Beginning with Heather Locklear, and Reese Witherspoon and  Ryan Phillipe in the late 90s,  it’s has been a wildly popular celebrity fave.

BrigitteBrigitte Bardot, saucy French ‘sex kitten’ of the 1950s, left a permanent imprint on her alliterative full name—in fact one current celebrity has used her surname for his daughter.

Charlize—Contemporary actress Charlize Theron was born in South Africa to parents of German, French and Dutch ancestry, and was given her distinctive name in honor of her father, Charles. It has just started to be used in this country in the past few years, with that ‘z’ adding sizzle to Charlie.

GretaEarly film icon Greta Garbo had an exotic and mysterious aura which still clings to her name.  A German diminutive of Margarethe, Greta has been used for their daughters by David Caruso, and by Phoebe Cates and Kevin Kline.

Harlow—This is one rare case where the last name is more glamorous than the first—Jean—of the sensual 1930s Platinum Blonde. Patricia Arquette was the first to use it for her daughter, followed by Nicole Richie and Joel Madden—and it’s sure to catch on with other parents.

Read More