Category: baby name style

a Name Sage post by: Abby View all Name Sage posts
baby name patterns

What do you do when you’ve created a baby name pattern, and now none of the names you love fits? Does your next baby break the mold, or does family unity carry the day?

Katie writes:

My due date is September 30 and we are expecting a girl, our fourth child!

We are feeling a bit stuck trying to find the perfect name to fit with siblings Jamison, Lillian Blake, and Rosewyn Cole, nicknames Jam, Lilly and Wynnie.

Names we’ve considered but still hesitate on are: Magdalen or Madeleine, Noah, Elouise, Lawson, and even Gable. Noah Madeleine is a favorite right now.

I unintentionally started something with the first three children. All three names end in n, are 7 letters long, and the girls both have flower names. The girls also have traditionally male middle names.

I’m finding it hard to pick a name that matches our previous criteria.

The Name Sage replies:

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The Upside of Having an Unusual Name

defense of unusual name

by Addie Kugler-Lunt

The story of my name began as unconventionally as my birth. My mom was so convinced that she was going to have a boy, that she wove blue ribbons into the lace on the night gown she sewed for my birth. Since my parents were planning a home birth, they were more occupied with reading about Ina May Gaskin’s revolutionary approach and attending Bradley Method birthing classes, than they were looking for names. So, there were no girl’s names picked out before I arrived.

Samuel and Tobias were their top choices if I had been a boy. As a young girl, I remember thinking, “I’m glad I wasn’t a boy.” Now I smile at my younger self, and easily appreciate those timeless names. But in my childhood imaginings, Samuel felt too traditional and Tobias seemed too “hippy-dippy.”

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By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

Styles change.

In hemlines and hairdos, in music and cuisine and baby names, too.

Once upon a time, Mildred was a Top Ten name in the US.  Clarence, Connie, Randy, Dawn, Eugene, Norman, Norma, Crystal, Dustin, Myrtle, and Elmer have all ranked in the Top 50 names at one point or another.

It can take years for a name to transition from emerging trend to solidly established choice.  But this week’s baby name news highlights many of the changes happening now.

Change is constant, but some of the outcomes are fresh and new, and it is too soon to say which names will catch on.  Will Americans embrace truly gender neutral names?  Are noun names mainstream?  Should you double-check the spelling on every single name, no matter what?

Read on for nine baby names in the news, and what they might signal for the next generation of children.

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Some stylish baby names in Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel’s Nameberry 9.

When I heard that Lily Allen was expecting a second child, my heart skipped a beat.

I don’t know Lily Allen.  When her first baby arrived, I had to Google search to find out that she was a singer, and I’d never heard her sing until I headed to YouTube.

The British pop starlet turned television presenter made waves with her first daughter’s name, Ethel Mary, and I’ve followed her ever since.  She didn’t disappoint with her second daughter’s name, Marnie Rose.

What would you call Allen’s style?

I’m thinking “So Retro it Hurts.”  She chooses great names that few of us have the guts to use – yet.

We classify names as traditional or modern, classic or trendy.  But the truth is that everything goes when it comes names, and there are all sorts of styles and strategies to describe our approaches to naming children.

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Yesterday we did a rundown on the divide between the girls’ names that are stylish to the point where it feels like they must be popular and those that are actually, statistically widely used.  It’s especially hard to distinguish when it comes to the names we see appearing so often in berry posts and blogs.

So here we do a similar analysis for the boys, with some similarly surprising results, especially when it comes to those berry faves,…names such as Theo.  It’s easy to be fooled if you live in a place where there are more Atticuses than Aidens in your neighborhood playground.

Once again, the numbers in parentheses represent how many babies were given that name in the most recent U.S. Count.

Abner (162) is stylish, while Abraham (1,899) is popular

Ace (395) is cool; Chase (6,397) is hot

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