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ff--audrey

Some movie characters have a long afterlife, remembered way beyond their release dates, their names firmly attached to the actor who inhabited the role. In our collective memory, for instance, Judy Garland will always be Dorothy and Diane Keaton forever Annie Hall. Here’s a look at just a few of these iconic characters—and whether or not their names had any impact on naming.  Might one be right for your new baby girl?

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posted by: tararyaz View all posts by this author
creepyexorcist

By Tara Ryazansky

The season is finally here.  That first twinge of cold weather makes most people run for pumpkin lattes, cute sweaters and apple picking, but I must admit I start thinking about Halloween by the end of August.  It’s the part of Autumn that I get most excited for.  The costumes, the decorations, the new release horror movies and the old ones playing on television.But it got me thinking, can a horror movie ruin a great baby name?  Lots of creepy character names have gotten more popular after gaining notoriety in scary films.  Damien, Gage, Regan and Samara all became more appealing to new parents despite belonging to evil children onscreen.  Which names can rise above those awful associations and which ones are unwearable because of them?

Damien- Damien Thorn, what a great sounding name.  Too bad it’s the name of evil incarnate!  At least it is in the 1976 movie The Omen, and in the 2006 reboot that they probably made just to drag a lovely name through the mud all over again!  The Omen is such a classic film that plenty of people think Damien is synonymous with Devil Child or Son of the Devil.  The name actually means to tame or subdue and it has lots of nicer namesakes.  Still, the Damian spelling might be a better choice unless you’re a horror fanatic.

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Combo Names: When 1 plus 1 equals 1

posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
combo

By Angela Mastrodonato of Upswing Baby Names

Reminiscent of fifties doo-wop songs and southern cotillions, combo names are finding their way back to baby name lists after a decades-long absence.

Combo names are two existing names combined to create one. They can also be called “smoosh names” or “mash-up names” or compound names. Some examples: Annalee, Marylouise, and Miabella.

Sometimes they are spelled with a hyphen (Anna-Lee) and sometimes they are spelled as one name (Annalee).

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abby--maryolive

This week, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel finds inspiration for the Nameberry 9 from celebrity birth announcements and TV listings.

I know it has been a busy week in baby name news when my friend C makes a point of seeking me out.  “So what are they going to name the baby?” she asked, knowing that she didn’t have to add that “they” are William and Kate and the baby in question will be hounded by more paparazzi than a Jolie-Pitt kid.

Then again, bookies couldn’t take bets on the name of a new Jolie-Pitt arrival.  Where would a gambler begin?  We know the royal couple is up against some definite limits in choosing their child’s name, creating a perfect opportunity for the placing of bets, a scenario that couldn’t exist in Hollywood.

What separates name nerds from others might be this: I am filled with curiosity whenever I meet an expectant parent.  “Have you thought about names?” I’ll mention, casually, trying to not make it too obvious.  Aidan Donnelly Rowley’s post congratulating Kate struck a chord.  It doesn’t really matter if I know you – I’m excited for that new little person you’re about to welcome, and very willing to help if you’d like to talk names.

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roses2

With Rose beginning to wilt from overexposure as a middle name, this might be a good time to look at other roseate options—including the somewhat neglected Rose-as-a-first name itself.  Several of these names have Germanic roots that have nothing to do with the flower, but they all now project the floral scent of the rose.

RoseRose, the fragrant symbol of England and matriarch of this family, predates the other flower names that emerged at the end of the nineteenth century; it was a Top 30 name from 1880 through 1932, when more elaborate and exotic forms of the name came into the picture.  It still ranks quietly at Number 337, just about where it’s been for decades.  Appearing in vehicles ranging from Titanic to The Golden Girls to Harry Potter, to a million old songs, its image has been rejuvenated by younger recent bearers like Rose Byrne and Rose McGowan.

Rosa—The soft and lovely Rosa, an upscale British favorite, as well as a Spanish and Italian standard, was a Top 60 name in the US at the turn of the last century.  The written form of Rose in old Latin documents, Rosa has been used as a name from the beginning of the nineteenth century. Notable namesakes include French painter Rosa Bonheur and Civil Rights activist Rosa Parks; Rosa Dartle is a character in David Copperfield. The change of the final vowel gives it a lot more substance and flow than Rose.

Rosabella is a smoosh name formed in the nineteenth century to mean beautiful rose, and it could become a new member of the Bella bunch. Others are Rosalba, meaning white rose, and Rosellawhich is also the name of a colorful parrot.

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