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alice-in-wonderland (1)

What’s your favorite classic girls’ name?

And by classic, we mean timeless choices such as Elizabeth, Sarah, and Margaret.

We also mean currently fashionable classics such as Charlotte and Alice.

In fact, when you tell us which classic girls’ name is your favorite, maybe you can also tell us why you consider it a classic.

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1914alice

At the beginning of the year, we like to flip back the calendar a hundred years to see what the baby name landscape looked like a century ago. 1914 was a year in which World War I was in full swing, the year that President Wilson officially established Mother’s Day, Charlie Chaplin and Babe Ruth made their debuts, and saw the births of Dylan Thomas, Jonas Salk and Joe DiMaggio.But the babyname universe was relatively calm, as we can see by looking at the stable top dozen girls’ names. Here, they are, in order of their 1914 popularity, and what their status is today:

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The Nameberry 9 by Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

Brooklyn is big in Sioux City. Jack remains #1 in Scotland, Jayden is #2 in California, and Liam is most popular in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

If it is the end of the year, it is time for top names, and individual health systems to entire countries oblige by releasing their data.

But what does it mean if you are actually choosing a name for a child in the next few months?

Some parents insist on avoiding the newly-declared Top Ten, even if Noah or William was a long-time favorite. Others hope for something familiar, but not shared with too many others. And some of us will go to the fringes, considering obscurities from the dictionary and our family trees.

Maybe the best part of naming a kiddo in 2014 is that you don’t have to opt for something as daring as Godred or Thelonious, or as Hollywood-issued as Rainbow or North to choose a distinctive name.

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By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

We love to talk about celebrities who choose far-out names for their children. But how about those who take the royal route, giving their kids names that are more Buckingham Palace than Hollywood play date?

I thought there might be oodles of starbabies with monarch-worthy monikers. But if we’ve learned anything from the Great Kate Wait, it’s that the list of possible names for a new prince or princess is pretty short.

Plenty of high profile parents play it safe, sticking with popular picks like Ava and Zoe, or traditional names like Daniel and Joseph. But despite their popularity and long history of use, those aren’t names fit for a future king or queen

Many of the names rumored to be on the royal shortlist are rare in Tinsel Town. Alexandra, Caroline, Victoria, Diana, and Anne are seldom heard, and the same is true for the boys’ list. Then again, actor Sean Astin has three regally named girls, and Eva Herzigova’s three sons all wear royal appellations, too.

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posted by: Elea View all posts by this author
royalprincessalice

By Eleanor Nickerson of British Baby Names

Traditionally, members of British royalty have not only been given a whole string of middle names, most have also been given an affectionate nickname. Queen Victoria’s children, for example, answered to Vicky (Victoria), Bertie (Albert), Alee (Alice), Affie (Alfred), Lenchen (Helena), Loosy (Louise), Leo (Leopold) and Baby (Beatrice).

Previously, these names were kept within the family. But more recently, Charles and Diana broke the mold by formally announcing after their sons’ births that they were going to call WilliamWills” and that Henry was to be called “Harry”.

This then opens up a variety of options for William and Catherine. Let’s say they choose the name “Elizabeth Diana Catherine Charlotte” for a daughter.  They could use a nickname for the first name – Bess, Betsy, Lily, Eliza? – or announce that they will call her by one of her middle names, or even a nickname from the middle name – Lottie, say, or Kitty.

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