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Category: baby name Leo

easter14bunnies

Christmas may have its reindeer and holly, and Thanksgiving its turkeys, but no holiday has as many flowers and trees and animals associated with it as Easter, symbols that evolved from both pagan and Christian sources. From Jesus as “the Lamb of God,” to chicks and bunnies symbolizing abundant new life, to the Easter lily, there’s a wealth of baby name inspiration to be found in the flora and fauna of Easter.

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Nameberry 9 by Abby Sandel, Appellation Mountain

As the year draws to a close, we have a bumper crop of celebrity birth announcements to celebrate.

The newest arrivals answer to some very on-trend names: fierce, daring, nature-themed, a little bit rock and roll.

Some of them might even seem fanciful, the tiniest bit over-the-top.  But we live in an age where imagination and creativity are prized.  From Pinterest to Etsy, the rise of DIY and crafting and an emphasis on design has filtered into how we think about our children’s names.

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august

By Linda Rosenkrantz

August is here, and while it might not have as many related names as June or July, it still deserves its due.  August may be hot and humid, and bring with it tropical storms and hurricanes, but it’s also a time for holidays and getaways–and some distinguished baby names.

Before it was renamed it in honor of the Emperor Augustus for the Julian calendar, it was known as Sextilis, as it was the sixth month of the Roman calendar—but we’ll let that one alone as we examine some other month-related names for your August babe.

AugustThis has become the most popular month name for boys, now at Number 333; it was as high as 175 at the end of the nineteenth century.  Always popular in Scandinavia, August is currently 28 in Denmark, and it’s been chosen for their sons by such celebs as Mariska Hargitay and Dave MatthewsGarth Brooks used it for his daughter, but that seems to have been something of an anomaly, at least so far. Its use as a word name—with the accent on the second syllable—lends August a dignified, upstanding element.  Namesakes include two notable playwrights: August Strindberg and August Wilson. And it comes with a choice of two friendly nicknames: Augie or Gus.

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posted by: omnimom View all posts by this author
omnix

By Lauren Apfel, aka omnimom

In 1642, Oliver Cromwell led a contingent of parliamentarians against King Charles I, defeating him in what became known as the English Civil War and giving rise to the only occasion in modern British history where the monarchy has not held power. Three and a half centuries later, he became my husband’s hero for it, my husband who is a constitutional lawyer and a committed republican (small ‘r’).  In the years before the arrival of our first child, we lived in Oxford, both of us affiliated with the University there. Amidst its hallowed halls and Gothic spires, people would talk in hushed tones about their ‘periods’ of expertise. My husband’s period was the seventeenth century. Cromwell was his guy.

Unsurprisingly, Oliver was always his first choice for a boy’s name.  It became mine too. We said we weren’t having children, though, so we bestowed instead the name Cromwell upon our future dog, a brown and white beagle. Things changed and we didn’t get the dog.  But we did welcome a son who was, of course, called Oliver.  My husband wanted it because it was traditional and historically grounded. I wanted it because it was sparky and unconventional. It is both of those things, depending on where you come from: this is what has made the Venn diagram effect of our name selection so successful.  The year Oliver was born it was the fifth most popular baby name in the UK. In the US, it hadn’t even broken the top 100.

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popeadrian

Just as the billows of white smoke emanating from the Sistine Chapel in Vatican City signal the election of a new pope, so does the name he chooses for himself signal his aspirations for his papacy.  Pope Francis broke precedent by picking one that had never been used before, but which has deep meaning for him and projects a strong symbolic resonance to the outside world.

The new Pope revealed that the inspiration for his chosen name was St. Francis of Assisi (born Giovanni), the venerated patron saint of animals and the environment, known for his humility.  He also stated that in the cardinals’ name discussions some of the papal appellations put forth were Adrian, and Clement, while others were hoping for Leo, who had been a beacon of social justice.

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