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posted by: mill1020 View all posts by this author
seusss

By Laura Miller Brennan

Say

Look at our bookshelves!

One, two three…

How many Seuss books

Do I see?

How can it be that our family owns only eight of his classics, not counting poetry within other children’s anthologies or the duplicate, dog-eared copies of The Cat in The Hat?  He wrote 40+ books in his lifetime, and the work of Theodor Seuss Geisel is ingrained in the English lexicon.  Still, we take Dr. Seuss’ contributions for granted ‘ever so muchly’ that most of us pronounce his name incorrectly.  Geisel’s mother’s German maiden name Seuss actually rhymes with “voice”, not “use” (as in, “the Simplest Seuss for youngest use”).  It’s rumored that he didn’t mind, due to the sound-alike quality of ‘Seuss’ to children’s author Mother Goose.  In any case, the ultimate Seuss-ism could be naming one’s child in homage to him.  Here is a nearly-exhaustive list of Seuss names…

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By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

Styles change.

In hemlines and hairdos, in music and cuisine and baby names, too.

Once upon a time, Mildred was a Top Ten name in the US.  Clarence, Connie, Randy, Dawn, Eugene, Norman, Norma, Crystal, Dustin, Myrtle, and Elmer have all ranked in the Top 50 names at one point or another.

It can take years for a name to transition from emerging trend to solidly established choice.  But this week’s baby name news highlights many of the changes happening now.

Change is constant, but some of the outcomes are fresh and new, and it is too soon to say which names will catch on.  Will Americans embrace truly gender neutral names?  Are noun names mainstream?  Should you double-check the spelling on every single name, no matter what?

Read on for nine baby names in the news, and what they might signal for the next generation of children.

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posted by: upswingbabynames View all posts by this author
motor

by Angela Mastrdonato of Upswing Baby Names

Boy names have inspired me lately. Here are some brilliant names with masculine swagger and a bit of 1960′s charm. If I were to write a novel with beatnik characters, these would be the names of the male characters. In my opinion they embody the motorcycle-riding poet.

These names were loosely inspired by the media portrayal of beatniks from the late 50′s-early 60′s. Beatniks were portrayed young adults who wore black turtlenecks with berets, hung out in coffee shops, recited poetry and expressed anti-establishment sentiments. They were precursors to the hippies.

These weren’t necessarily names of real beatniks or popular baby names in the 60′s, but most have a retro feel and many have artistic or literary associations. These names seem cultured with an edge.

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Presidential Baby Names: Hail to the Chiefs

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Just as other countries have their royal names, America has had a long tradition of honoring our  presidents, going back at least as far as John Quincy Adams naming one of his sons George Washington Adams.  Not to mention the presidential surnames that have become latter day fads—think Taylor and Tyler and Madison and Jackson.  Today we’re looking at the first, middle and last names of all the past Chief Executives, to arrive at our Nameberry Picks for best presidential baby names today.

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This week, Appellation Mountain‘s Abby Sandel looks  at the sometimes hidden meaning of names –the associations that often go beneath and  beyond their literal meanings.

It’s easy to look up the meaning of a name.

Sure, they can be subject to debate.  Do Libby and Betsy really retain Elizabeth’s meaning?  But meanings are right there, a few keystrokes away for anyone with internet access.

It is much tougher to nail down associations.  The name Cecilia means blind, but my first thought is the Simon & Garfunkel song.  Caleb means dog, but all of the Calebs I’ve known have been cute little boys.

If meanings rarely change, associations are always shifting.  We forget a book or a movie, or a song falls out of fashion.  Bridget was once a generic term for a maid, but today it is a perfectly acceptable name for a daughter.

This week’s nine most newsworthy baby names all have strong positive associations, though none of them are in the US Top Ten – yet.

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