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Category: baby name King

lennon

Hero names, names chosen in honor of personal heroes or heroines outside your own family, have been a rising class of names over recent years. They offer strong meaning for parents, powerful role models for their namesakes, plus names more distinctive than the Johns and Marys often found in the family tree. Hero names we see on the rise right now connect to luminaries of the arts, sciences, commerce, and politics both past and present. Some are surnames appropriated as firsts while others are distinctive first names. Here, 12 of the hottest hero and heroine names on the charts:

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inventhedy

We’ve looked across history and geography at the men and women whose inventions have affected our lives—in both major ways (the electric light bulb, the elevator)  and minor (the coffee filter, the crossword puzzle)—and picked those with the best baby-name potential.

And here are our top Nameberry picks of historic baby names based on those of important inventors:

Alessandro Volta–Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio Gerolamo Umberto Volta was an Italian physicist who invented the battery in the nineteenth century.

Amalie Auguste Melitta Bentz –As you might have guessed from her second middle name, A.A. Melitta  Bentz invented the coffee filter.

Arthur Wynne—Liverpool-born journalist Arthur Wynne created the first crossword puzzle.  Originally called word-cross, it debuted in the New York World newspaper in 1913.

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abby--oscars

As the race towards the Oscars heats up, Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain offers her annual analysis of possible award-winning baby names–the most interesting names attached to nominees and the characters they play.

Award season is in full swing, with the Golden Globes last month and the Oscars coming up soon.

A glance at any kindergarten roster demonstrates Hollywood’s impact on baby names.  Audrey, Ava, Olivia, and Natalie all belonged to screen legends long before they were among the most popular choices for our daughters.  Surname choices like Harlow, Monroe, Gable, and even Chaplin have been heard.

But those are Golden Age names.  How about the nominees for 2013?  There are some fascinating choices, rich with potential for a son or a daughter.

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noble

There was a time when the titles of nobility seemed to be reserved strictly for the canine world, as in “Here Prince!” “Here, Duke!” But that seems to be changing.

When Guiliana and Bill Rancic recently named their son Edward Duke, the Edward was for family members on both sides, but they always intended to call him by his middle name, because, said Guiliana, Duke is such a strong name.  And she’s not the first celebrity to think so. Diane Keaton bestowed it on her son in 2001, and Justine Bateman followed suit the following year.

In fact, several of these blue-blood titles have been a lot more popular than you might imagine.

Earl is the one name in this category that came to be accepted as a name apart from its noble heritage—but has anything but a lofty image—especially since My Name is Earl.  But Earl didn’t fall off the list until 2006—before that it was a Top 50 name until 1939 and then stayed in the Top 100 through 1954, attached to such distinguished figures as Chief Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren, banjo player Earl Scruggs and jazzman Earl ‘Fatha’ Hines, as well as basketball star Vernon Monroe known as “Earl the Pearl.”  Perry Mason-creator E. Stanley Gardner spelled his first name Erle.  Is it possible that Earl could follow sister Pearl back into favor?

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