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Category: baby name Jasper

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oldnewangie

by Angela Mastrodonato , Upswing Baby Names

Some of my favorite names are those that come across as modern but end up having a big past. These names hide their age well, giving them versatility.

Simply put, these are old names that sound new. If you are torn between the imaginative and the established, these names could be for you.

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abby1-13-13

By Abby Sandel of Appellation Mountain

What’s the 2014 equivalent of the old phrase “Every Tom, Dick, and Harry?”

Every Aiden, Mason, and Jake?

Every Max, Zac, and Jackson?

The most popular names for boys used to hold steady for years.  In 1932, the ten most popular names for boys born in the US were Robert, James, John, William, Richard, Charles, Donald, George, Joseph, and Thomas.  Twenty years later, eight of those ten names were still dominant.  Fast-forward to the 1980s, and 30% of the 1932 boys’ Top Ten still ranked.

As for the girls?  That’s a different picture.  Between 1932 and 1952, seven of the girls’ Top Ten fell.  Shirley and Doris made way for Linda and Susan, and the change has continued at a rapid pace.  None of the 1930s or 1950s girls’ favorites still held a top spot by 2012.

And yet there are more wearable names for boys than ever before.  Plenty of parents are still passing down grandpa Joseph’s name, but the pressure to do so seems to be on the decline.  We live in a more accepting age, where diversity in names feels quite normal.

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chris13-nicholas

There are certain names, like Merry and Christmas and Noel/Noelle, that scream to the world. “I’m a Yuletide baby!” One way around this, if you still want to acknowledge the season, is to pick names that are related but are also used all year round, to the extent that they’re found in the Top 500, given to babies born in July as well as December. Here are some examples—both religious and secular — that do relate to the holiday, but in a quieter voice, shown in the order of their current popularity:

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teenerd

By  Josie Crocker aka whirligig

How would you like to have a daughter who arrives home from school declaring she has ‘fallen in love’ only to find out that she means with a name and not a spotty, immature member of the opposite sex? How would you like a daughter that returns from a shopping trip with ‘The Brilliant Book of Baby Names’ (aka The Baby Name Bible), and tells of how her friend thought she was joking when she said she was purchasing this book? Are you relieved that it wasn’t a pair of £200 heels? Would you rather be banning her from going out drinking on a Friday night or ban her from spending her night on Nameberry?

I am that daughter–that name obsessed crazy daughter that gets a weird look from the librarian as she asks where the pregnancy section is (full of naming goodness) and gets up earlier than usual with cries of ‘I need to print out this name list before school’ instead of spending hours painting my nails and straightening my hair. Here is a brief timeline of my naming history–from the innocent registers of role-play to the beautiful and plain ridiculous.

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Baby Names That Mean Red

Screen shot 2013-08-20 at 8.47.33 AM

by Pamela Redmond Satran

When I was having my first child, we had a boys’ name (Henry) picked out from the very beginning.  But when it began to occur to us eight months into the pregnancy that this baby might be a girl, we were stumped for a name.

My husband and I had very different ideas about stye in girls’ names.  Family names seem to create more problems than they solved, and so when we found a way to focus our search that we could both agree on, we were delighted.

Our mission: To find a name that meant red.  I loved the color red, my hair is reddish, and my last name is Redmond, so red incorporated a lot of potent symbols for me and helped balance the fact that our child would carry my husband’s surname.

We ended up naming our daughter Rory, but there are a lot of other wonderful names that mean red for both girls and boys.  If red is a meaning that catches fire with you, consider these scarlet-hued options:

Adam – Adam stands out on this list as a true classic boys’ name — Adam‘s meaning is “son of the red earth.”  Though a bit overused in recent years, Adam is still and forever a solid choice that remains in the Top 100.

Clancy – This Irish surname name meaning “red-haired warrior” can work for both boys and girls, but it’s got a masculine ring to us, perhaps thanks to the musical Clancy Brothers and author Tom.  Clancy is an unusual baby name for either gender, used for only 17 boys and five girls in the US in 2012.

Crimson – Love Scarlett but want a more distinctive alternative?  Then crisp and luscious Crimson might be the choice for you.  The word comes from the Old Spanish kermes, an insect whose shell created deep red dye.

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