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Category: baby name Freya

newnames-daleyza

One of the most interesting things to check out when a new Social Security list appears each year is which names have cracked the Top 1000 for the first time, and this edition saw quite a few particularly cool examples. Some, not surprisingly, popped on via a pop culture/celebrity  connection, some reflect some more widespread trends, while others are the inevitable spelling variations (yes, you, Jurnee and Kamdyn) that might prove to be one-time wonders. Here are 12 new names most likely to have staying power:

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spring5

By Linda Rosenkrantz

In most places, Spring—to use an overused phrase—has sprung.  The snows of winter have finally melted, buds are budding, birds are chirping.  Which means it’s time to offer a seasonal menu of names—this time a multi-cultural mix whose meanings connote spring, plus names of ancient goddesses, and a few flowers and birthstones.

Amaryllis, the lovely spring-blooming bulb, is one of the more extreme flower names now beginning to be cultivated; others include Hyacinth and Daffodil.

Aviv and Aviva are male and female versions of a Hebrew name meaning ‘springtime’; another variation is Avivi, which means ‘springlike’ and is also the word for lilac.  (Tel Aviv , btw, means ‘hill of spring’.)  Aviva has long been popular in Israel and its two vibrant v’s could work well here as another path to vibrant nickname Vivi.

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Pilot

by Linda Rosenkrantz

The names of TV characters have had an influence on baby naming since the era of must-see daytime soaps and Dallas and Dynasty, and more recently we’ve seen the effect of the Mad Men midcentury matrix and individual names like Finn and Dexter and Addison and Aria and Arya taking hold.

Things are a little different now, with fewer people glued to their TV screens—or even their tablets or phones—to watch ‘appointment’ television.  And yet, with the new season beginning, I can’t help wondering if any of the more distinctive names of the characters on debuting shows might catch on.  The one freshman period program, Reign, offers some possibilities, as do The Originals—a spin-off of The Vampire Diaries and the sci-fi The Tomorrow People.

And with two hunky ex-models playing characters named Killian on two different new shows, I think I’d put my money on him.

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britflorence

Eleanor Nickerson, of the wonderful blog British Baby Names, offers her predictions of the names that will succeed today’s trendiest in England and Wales.

The Next Olivia

Olivia was the supreme queen of girls’ names in 2008, 2009 and 2010 in England and Wales, and was only marginally beaten by Amelia to the number 1 spot in 2011. It entered the Top 100 for the first time in the late 1980s, and has been in the Top 10 since 1999. Further down the ranks, Eliza stands at #62.  Like Olivia before, Eliza has not ranked in the Top 100 for a century, but is now steadily rising.

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Aussie Names: Big there, not here

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In her guest blog, Anna Otto, of the popular site Waltzing More Than Matilda, introduces names particular to the land of Oz, explains their origins  and tells us why we might consider importing them.

Australia and the United States share many popular names and name trends, but here are some examples familiar to us that have never made the US Top 1000. A few are popular in Australia, several are fashionable, rising in popularity, or well-used, and a couple are notable for becoming the choice of hip parents. But can any of these names make it in America?  Some might just need a bit more exposure, while others are probably not as usable. Which do you feel strangely drawn to, and which simply bewilder you? 

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